Impact of Going Abroad

Studying abroad with Fisher has been one of the highlights of my college experience. In our short time of 11 days we were able to see and experience so many things. I had previously studied abroad in high school with my senior Spanish class to Costa Rica to experience the culture and language. This immersion was entirely different. The business component is what made this trip. Being able to speak in my native language, English, to global business professionals is something that simply could not be done in a normal classroom at Ohio State.

This experience opened my eyes to just how connected the world is today. We were able to meet Ohio University band students and directors who were playing at the Vatican, an English teacher from my hometown of Dayton (Ohio), and plenty of Michigan and OSU fans. In a single restaurant in Italy we met people from Denmark, Romania, Italy, Finland, England, Spain, Brazil, Germany, and France. In one single restaurant. These were just people my own age that we spoke to. It was unbelievable.

Our classroom discussions were reinforced daily in real life discussions. While we were discussing the European Union with one of the representatives I remembered tidbits of information that Melissa had taught us in class. This was classroom learning implemented in the truest form. We were using knowledge learned from a book to speak with someone who actually worked in the EU! It was phenomenal. It made the learning experience so much more real and beneficial.

One interesting fact I remembered from the class is a woman that was mentioned who ran a business making gluten-free dough. Surprisingly, most of her business was overseas through exporting. Today’s world is so much more different than it was thirty years ago. It’s hard to believe a woman can make a living selling dough by shipping it all over the world as opposed to a conventional bakery.

After going abroad with Fisher I am much more interested in International Business. Although my major is Finance I definitely plan to look into career opportunities that may allow international travel opportunities. It would be amazing to find a job with a global corporation that would allow me to meet with colleagues in other countries.

The benefits of going abroad are not only academic and professional. Some of my best friends at Ohio State are Global Lab students that I never met before this trip. We bonded in the class time and overseas. Not only that, but the friendships we have made will surely be valuable someday. We are all Fisher Direct Honors students. When we returned in the fall and visited the involvement fair I saw more Global Lab students than any of my other friends. We were all there representing different organizations! Whether it was the running club, or a fraternity or sorority, or the Undergraduate Finance Association, so many of us were there. The students who went on this trip with me are some of the best, brightest, and most involved in Fisher. There is no doubt that we are all headed toward bright futures.

 

How Firm Thy Friendship O-H-I-O

The Idea of “Kaisu”

Officially, it’s Week 4 of my semester here at Singapore Management University. Only 9 more weeks to go before it finals time! Not that I want the semester to come to end, it’s been amazing living and studying out here.

My new campus!

I’ve been experiencing so many new things here and adjusting to everything at the same time. I find that Singapore is not much of a culture shock for me as I’ve been to Asia before. What I find interesting is however is the myriad of cultures here. Singapore has four national languages- English, Mandarin, Malay, and Tamil. Every day I find myself hearing all four languages. Singapore is still a mystery to me because it’s hard to pinpoint what precisely the Singaporean culture is. It’s a wonderful mix of the West and the East.

Before I got here, I didn’t realize that I would be adjusting to SMU (Singapore Management University) culture in additional the local culture. The culture at my university is a whole new ballpark. I’ve noticed that the academic competition is fiercer here. In fact, it’s straight up cutthroat. There’s a Singlish word here (Singlish is a unique blend of English, Mandarin, Malay, Tamil, and local dialects that is spoken in casual conversation) called Kiasu that means, “fear of losing”. Kiasu is a part of Singaporean culture as people grow up ingrained with the notion that hard work will get you ahead. It also means that Singaporeans are generally very competitive by nature in all aspects of their lives.

The idea of Kiasu became even clearer after my class discussion today. I’m taking a class called “Current Issues in Business, Society, and Government” and today we talked about Singapore’s education system. We watched a movie called, “I Not Stupid” by Jack Neo which is about three boys who are at a disadvantage because they’ve been streamlined into EM3. In the past, Singapore used to streamline students into three academic streams (EM1, EM2, EM3), the best students were placed in EM1 and the students who learned at a lower pace were placed into EM3. Although EM3 was supposed to create a learning environment suitable for students who needed a slower pace, it actually had negative effects for the students because it created a stigma that these students were “stupid”. There was also no possibility that EM3 students would move up the ranks. All of this relied on an examination that students took around age 10. As you can imagine, growing up here is very different than growing up in the US.

One of the best things about studying abroad is the exposure to different societies, cultures, and ideas that I would have not realized if I wasn’t here such as the idea of Kaisu. I’m constantly learning something new each day and I look forward to sharing all of these experiences through this blog!