Audencia, Nantes Education

Hello everyone! It is near the end of the semester here at Audencia in Nantes France, and so far I have had the time of my life on the Student Exchange Program. Studying abroad has been the best decision I have made in my life so far and I have made memories that will last forever.

In this blog, I will discuss the academic side of my experience. I attend a business school that is ranked in the top 5 in France that consists of about 3,000 students. This has been a huge change coming from being around 60,000 students at Ohio State, as you see classmates every single day at the University. The classes each consist of about 40 people, and roughly 30 of these students are in every single one of your classes. This has allowed me to really get to know a lot of people in the classroom setting, which I feel is much different than back in the US.

Also, the classwork here is heavily oriented on group work, also helping further develop these relationships. The groupwork in France is much different than in the United States, as people do not have a strong time structure on when to get things done, and tasks are often not split up like they are back in the US. The whole group normally meets to do the entire project together, and meetings often consist of a lot of talk outside of things pertaining to the project. Another difference in the education system here is the way things are graded. The scale is from 0 – 20 instead of A – F, and grades are rarely given back on any of the work turned in during the semester. This makes it hard to judge how well the student is doing in the course, but also helps keep each student motivated to do well from start to finish. Classwork consists of mainly case studies and presentations, and then the semester ends with final exams worth anywhere from 50% to 100% of the grade.

The overall experience at Audencia has been great, and the classes I took in the Grand Ecole (general course) program served as a great connection of the material of what I have learned in the US. Audencia has been a fantastic choice to continue my educational career abroad!

Collaboration/Networking

Any student at the University of Manchester will agree that the school is incredibly international.  In comparison to OSU, Manchester seems to emphasize group work and collaboration between students not just for presentations, but for essays as well.  In just one of my classes, our group consisted of two British students, two Americans including myself, a French classmate, and two students from Ukraine.  Several of my classes emphasized not just learning how to work in a group, but also learning how to learn from each other.  The typical weekly assignments or quizzes that is often present at OSU, did not seem to have a strong presence.  I believe that this situation is an accurate reflection of the diverse backgrounds that will occur in the workforce, and business students who do not have some sort of international collaboration training are woefully under prepared.

One of the greatest advantages to studying abroad is the opportunity to network with your peers from around the world.  Life long friendships were made and I truly appreciate the opportunity to have been able to study abroad.  For example, I had the privilege of spending Christmas at the home of a friend of mine in Strasbourg, France. Very few people will ever have the chance to not just travel to another country, but form global friendships and experience a different culture not as a simple tourist.

10884819_10152970688652269_2120570274_n 10660313_10204201521931583_7740150714439955800_n

Reflecting on Italy

It is hard to believe that my four and a half months in Italy has come to a close. While there were many ups and downs this past semester has been an incredible experience. I will never forget the people I have met, the friends I have made, the things I have learned or the places I have visited. As I think back on this experience it amazes me all I was able to do and experience in such a short period of time. I have done things I have only dreamed about doing and its hard to bring that experience to a close. Italy brought me some amazing memories and helped me to develop a new perspective. I traveled to some amazing cities and learned so much about so many different cultures.

I cannot believe I have just wrapped up my finals and have concluded my fall semester of studies. Schooling was very different in Milan than it is here in the states and that was something that was hard to get used to! My classes in particular had no homeowrk assignments, no quizes or tests and many of them came down to a final and a project at the end of the year. This made preparing for my finals very difficult, but I am happy I got through them!

While I have learned there is no place like home I know I am going to miss Milan and all my friends there so much. This experience gave me the opportunity to meet and make friends from all over the world includeing places like Colombia and Chile. I am so thankful for these opportunities. Saying goodbye last week to an incredible city and incredible friends was much harder than I expected. However, I am happy to be home and this isnt goodbye, it’s until next time Italy! Ciao!!

Goodbye, Dublin

Finishing up my semester at Trinity College, Dublin brings with it some bittersweet feelings. Having a few moments between layovers on my flight home I now have a chance to reflect on the last couple of months and the experiences I have had. The last few weeks here have been quite busy with finals, saying farewell to friends, and of course some holiday shopping and in that time I have tried to revisit some of my favorite locations one last time. The city has been in Christmas lights since Halloween; no Thanksgiving means the Christmas season starts early. The lights put up on Grafton Street, one of the main shopping destinations, are dazzling and a lovely Christmas market has been set up near St. Stephens Green with local vendors peddling Christmas goods, cookies, and mulled wine. A lit tree has been set up on campus and provides the front square with some Christmas cheer at night. It’s a shame I won’t be able to be there for the actual Christmas celebrations.

Among all the Christmas cheer, I of course had to find time to finish up my courses and complete my finals requirements. All finals at Trinity are completed at year-end in May, including those classes that only run for the first semester. I of course am on my way back to the US as I write this and will not be able to sit my finals in May. Trinity therefore makes exceptions for this case and I had final project/essay requirements instead. This was different from many finals weeks I have had in the past. In all I had six essays and two final projects to complete in the last two and a half weeks. Most of the final assignments made nearly 100% of the grade in that class with not many other assignments through out the semester. Needless to say I was in the library for most of my days.

In particular, one of my classes had a focus on entrepreneurship and building a new business. For the class, I worked with a group to establish a business idea, build the framework, and write a proposal to potential investors. The class was set up as a competition with 65 teams presenting their idea. The winning group would receive further mentorship from our professor as well as 20% of the investment so the group could actually put the idea to work. Unfortunately our group was not one of the finalists. Outside of class, another group member and I joined another competition hosted by Trinity’s Entrepreneurial Society. The competition was set up much like the show Shark Tank. We joined hoping to get some feedback on our business proposal and obviously to try and win. Unfortunately our proposal was a bit underdeveloped at that point to move on in the competition but the experience gave us some exposure to presenting a business to investors and feedback from the panel of entrepreneurs. It’s to bad we couldn’t continue.

I have said it before and I will say it again, I am so glad that I had the opportunity to participate in OSU’s Student Exchange Program. It will for sure be one of the defining experiences in my college careers. Before leaving we were told to think of the things we would miss most while abroad and I of course said my friends and family. After this semester I can’t believe I was worried at all. I met some fantastic people at Trinity and they served as my family during Thanksgiving and I couldn’t have been happier. Dublin was a perfect city for me to live and I would definitely live there again if the opportunity came up. I am looking forward to being home for the holiday season and getting back to OSU next semester but I know that I will miss the people and city that I’ve grown to love.

Spike Lee at Bocconi

One of the great things about attending a prestigious business school is the opportunity to hear from prominent figures in the world. This extends beyond the typical C-suite faces, and today at Bocconi we had the privilege to welcome renowned director Spike Lee. He spoke first about his work in sports documentaries, and how sports can transcend boundaries in the classroom, community, and various cultures. Sporting events form a common bond for people who otherwise would have none, and their influence on our lives goes beyond the stadium or TV screen.

Lee also went on to discuss some of the prominent events in the United States right now revolving racial issues. His insight on these topics most importantly focused on the actions of young people, and the struggles and determination we have to resolve these issues. He said how inspired he is by the youth of America, and his words really seemed to move the crowd, particularly those unaware of some of the realities we are facing right now in the United States and how important our actions will be on the future of the country. Truly an inspirational and moving experience.

10850020_10152919231032392_7876053637364810108_n

Lucky Number Seven- EMGL Blog December 9th, 2014

Today’s class marked a very important milestone of the semester; we would be giving our last presentation of the year. After counting up the numerous presentations we have done over the past weeks, I realized this was going to be our seventh presentation. Seventh. Not many MBA or graduate programs can say they have given seven presentations in one 15-week class, let alone an undergraduate program. Since we have practically spent this entire semester in front of our peers presenting and the last presentation we gave was our 20-minute final group export project, this 5-minute one seemed like child’s play.

We had approximately 3-5 minutes to present on the individual interest topic we chose about Brazil. The presentation would then be followed by everyone’s favorite pastime: 2-minute hot-seat Q & A interrogating the presenter about his or her topic. Everyone got these topics cleared at the beginning of the year and have been slowly gathering information for this presentation all semester. The purpose of these individual short presentations was to educate the class on a variety of topics that will be essential to know when we step off the plane in Manaus. Some of the topics included were: the history of the rubber industry, the Brazilian business culture, the Manaus Free Trade Zone, special holidays in Brazil, the stock index, Japanese culture in Brazil, Prime Equipment, the Brazilians’ view on Americans, Afro- Brazilian culture and the presidential election. We had no restrictions when choosing our topic; it only had to be relevant to our travels to Manaus.

The vibe in the class was more laid back than normal and this is probably attributed to the fact that this was our seventh presentation and we were well equipped with what kinds of questions could be thrown at us. Also, we got to choose our own topics so we were 100% confident and comfortable with the topic. Even though we did not get through everyone’s presentations this week and some people will have to go next week, this class seemed like the pretty bow that seals the nicely wrapped package. Following the end of each presentation, Mr. Sword asked the presenter questions, but they were more opinion- based and not as technical as in the week’s past. After one was finished presenting, they received feedback not just about that specific presentation, but comments about how they performed throughout the entire semester. The students appreciated being recognized for the hard work they had put into preparing for their many presentations: the countless hours spent in the Mason study rooms researching and preparing with their group, gathering knowledge about their individual interest topic on their own time and managing the intentional vagueness with instructions, which at times could be challenging.

After everything is said and done, the presentations are complete, our nine- day trip to Manaus is over and we start a new and fresh semester, I know for a fact that the students of the EMGL will take everything they have learned from this class and apply it to their future endeavors. They will be able to successfully handle bosses that say, “Make a presentation about the potential market in “insert country here”. You present on Monday!” They will not just “successfully handle” the situation, but surpass the expectations of their superiors and be one more step ahead of their peers; the students can thank The Ohio State University and The Fisher College of Business, but especially the Emerging Market Global Lab to Brazil for that.

This is not meant to scare you!- EMGL Blog December 2nd, 2014

When the presenter starts with the disclaimer, “This information is not intended to scare you!” you know you are in for quite an interesting presentation. This is exactly what happened to the students of the EMGL to Manaus, Brazil yesterday evening. Dru Simmons, the International Risk Manager for The Ohio State University, came to our class to debrief us on all of the different scenarios we could encounter in Brazil; from the rare disease of chickengunya, a mosquito- born illness that is becoming more prevalent in South America, to alcohol and drug safety in Brazil. One would think this information would be dry and hard to sit through, but Simmons included a multitude of anecdotes that broke up the information and made it more extremely interesting. We learned about what the responsibilities of the Department of States Program are and what they are required to do in case there is an emergency in country. Simmons also advised us to dress down and not wear jewelry in public. To supplement this advice, Simmons illustrated how imperative it is when he told the short story of a woman who was being interviewed on the street of Rio about the street crime that was rampant there, and while she was in mid-sentence, someone came up and ripped the necklace right off of her neck!

IMG_6541

Simmons also encouraged us to invest in a money belt, so the money we carry on us is not visible to the public eye. Furthermore, he noted that there are a good number of credit card scams in Brazil, so we need to make sure we are monitoring our account while in- country to watch out for fraudulent activity. One of Simmons’ closing suggestions was to never ever under any circumstances leave a person behind. Even if they are being a drag or are not interested in what the group is doing, they should never be left alone. One point was made very clear in that the group sticks together.

As Simmons was wrapping up his spiel, Zach Grammel, the Program Coordinator for The Office of Global Business at OSU, jumped up to start his presentation about more specifics of our Brazil trip. He split the class into guy and girl groups as people exchanged curious looks thinking they were back at elementary school recess about to be selected for dodge ball teams- boys versus girls. It turns out that our task was to create a packing list in 3 minutes of exactly what we are going to take to Brazil. The girls came up with more items, but the boys ultimately won the challenge because they quantified what they are bringing i.e. two pairs of dress pants, three leisure shirts etc. Grammel expressed how small our flight would be by displaying a photo of the inside of the airplane and you could hear whispers throughout the room. Mr. Sword took this opportunity to urge the class not to be selfish and only bring one light suitcase, so no one would hold the class behind when we arrive in-country.

At the end of class, we went over some of the planned events that we will be doing in Brazil and after hearing about chickengunya diseases and high street crime rates for the last hour, one could visibly notice the morale of the students pick up. Everyone is very excited about the trip and some overly enthusiastic students even started a countdown on their phone. In case anyone was wondering, the Emerging Market Global Lab class to Brazil will be on a plane to the Amazon in 29 days 17 hours 1 minute and 10 seconds from this very moment!

Thankful- EMGL Blog November 25th, 2014

On Tuesday night, as the majority of the student population at Ohio State is gearing up for Mirror Lake jump or is already snuggled up by the fire at their house for Thanksgiving break, the students of the Emerging Market Global Lab class to Brazil are preparing for their last round of presentations. They welcome a surprise guest who was a past food export intern for Mr. Sword at the Ohio Development Service Agency. His name is Eric Krohngold and he now works for Oracle in Houston, Texas doing a myriad of tasks that involve information technology and software. He offered invaluable advice to the students about life after college and how to keep persevering until you land that first job. Krohngold also emphasized how important LinkedIn is for your professional life. “I thought LinkedIn was just for people who wore their cell phones on their belt buckle during high school, but I was wrong!” He told the class chuckling.

Students also took this opportunity to ask him questions about the interview process or what it was like transitioning from college life to “real-world life.” When asked why he chose to work for Oracle in Houston, Texas, he said, “Honestly, because it was the one job I thought I could not do. If you are not constantly learning and pushing yourself to do more, then you need to find a new job.” He commented on the interview process and mentioned that he glances at a candidate’s resume, but also focuses on who the person is as a human being. “Could I get along with them at the office? Do they have hobbies outside of work? These are key factors when choosing to hire someone.”

With our heads now full of wisdom from someone who has not only walked the walk, but has talked the talk, the final two groups prepare for their last presentation. The first group up was the 3-D printing group and they impressed the class with their silent video playing in the background showing the 3-D printer in action. Some comments they received at the conclusion of their presentation were that they were more nervous than in their previous presentations. They defended this remark by saying they cared so much about the project and had worked so hard at it that they wanted to perform well, which is very understandable. Mr. Sword also commented that some information seemed to be missing that was in previous presentations and they reasoned that they did not put this information in because they had said it in a previous presentation.

IMG_6494

The last group to go was the baby formula group. They started off with a skit in a grocery store with a baby doll trying to find the best baby formula. The feedback they got about this is that it is OK in a classroom setting, but would not bode well in an executive boardroom. They were also questioned about the competitor’s for their baby formula in Brazil. Were they American brands? Were they Brazilian Brands? The group struggled to give a clear answer and might have clouded the audience’s understanding even more. Some overall advice that was given to all of the groups was to have additional slides that you do not present, so when someone asks a specific question you can pull this slide up and show that you had thought about that very same topic. Also, another tip was to present the answer and then give the justification. If you keep justifying your reasoning throughout the whole presentation, then the answer is pretty anti-climatic.

At the conclusion of class when everyone was packing up to leave class and drive or fly home to visions of grandma’s homemade pecan pie and delectable green bean casserole, I know I speak for the whole class when I say, I am thankful for the experiences gained in the EMGL; dealing with ambiguous directions and learning not only how to absorb constructive criticism, but how to apply it and improve yourself in the future. The class can sleep easy in the coming days of break knowing that they can face critiques and move forward and for that I am eternally grateful.

A Numbers Game

The last Portuguese Language Lab was held tonight and it went over a useful topic: numbers. I began the class like any other and went over a scenario in which student would be shopping in Manaus and would need to greet the shop owner to ask him/her how much something costs.

Going over the conversation and telling the class what everything means.

Going over the conversation and telling the class what everything means.

I thought is would be a bit dry to teach students the numbers 0 to 100 by just writing them on the board, so I incorporated two Youtube videos which had a native speaker slowly enunciates each number while students repeated after her. In the first video for example, the speaker went over 0-20 which is usually the most challenging for learners because you need this base in order to say bigger numbers.

Youtube video detailing Portuguese numbers.

Youtube video detailing Portuguese numbers.

In order to encourage retention, I had my peers turn around from the board while they randomly tell me Portuguese numbers. Most of the time they found it easy to recite the numbers due to the similarities with Spanish (most students took Spanish in high school), but at times the pronunciation did confuse them. For example, the numbers três, quatro, cinco, and seis (three, four, five and six) have basically the same pronunciation as Spanish since they are both Romance languages, but there are some differences such as with sete, oito, nove and dez (seven, eight, nine, and ten).

Students practicing numbers as we go around the room.

Students practicing numbers as we go around the room.

The second video went over how to count from 20-100. It was simple because students only have to know the tens (20, 30, 40, 50, etc.) and the base numbers from 1 to 9 in order to form numbers. We practiced this by counting around the table from 0 to 100 as each person said one number. A number like 43 would be translated as “40 and three” or “quarenta e três“. After each video students were then able to go back to the conversation and practice saying something costing seventeen reals or “dezesete reais”.

After watching the video, I would go back to insert a random number and have volunteers practice using it at the "market".

After watching the video, I would go back to insert a random number and have volunteers practice using it at the “market”.

All in all, my experience as a Language Tutor was very beneficial. Not only was I helping to plan lessons and teach students what I knew, but I was able to review some concepts for myself. Those who were able to attend even one class were able to learn something that they would have otherwise never learned if they had not taken this Emerging Markets Lab course to Brazil.

A final treat of buckeyes as  students commemorate the last language lab.

A final treat of buckeyes as students commemorate the last language lab.

D- Day: EMGL Blog November, 18th 2014

Dun dun… dunn dunn… dunnn dunnn. This was the sound that was going through every EMGL students’ head at 5:27pm yesterday evening. The music to the Jaws movie was fitting because it was D-Day, the day of our final group export projects. The quick 5- minute presentations we have been giving every week for the past month of class pale in comparison to this mammoth final presentation. This presentation is required to be 15- 20 minutes or four times the length of our usual presentations.

IMG_6487
Everyone could sense a different energy walking into the classroom in Bolz Hall. This change was due to a combination of everyone being in “business professional,” the lack of sleep due to preparing for the presentation, the amount of other exams that just happened to fall on this Tuesday, and the frigid cold temperatures outside. Professor Sword could sense the anxiety in the room and acted quickly to reverse the energy. Less than a minute later, everyone in Bolz Hall could hear the beautiful musical intonations of the one and only Taylor Swift as she sang us the best advice to just “shake it off.” After the students took Swift’s advice, the parade of presentations began. First up was the air conditioning group. Throughout their presentations over the past month, they had been urged to increase their enthusiasm when presenting. All the students who have sat through their weekly presentations could sense a positive notable difference in their enthusiasm. At the end of their presentation, they were questioned on why they passed a template of an invoice around rather than just displaying it on the screen and were also probed about the break down of their numbers. Overall, they got solid feedback and set the bar high for the rest of the presentations.

IMG_6491
Up next was the latex glove group. In past classes, the audience had expressed concern over where they were going to sell their gloves and exactly what kind of glove they would sell. They did a nice job of clarifying the concerns by being very specific on what kinds of gloves they were going to export etc. They even added a talking point about culture considerations when doing business with another country, in particular Brazil. Some things that we learned were that it is rude to use the “aye okay” symbol and that women should dress more feminine in the workplace than they do in the United States. They also received positive feedback, but some suggestions that were made included more eye contact with audience, stand closer to the audience and get rid of notes because they are an unnecessary clutch.

IMG_6495
After the latex glove group, the Luna Burger group was up to bat. They had a very visually appealing PowerPoint and reached out to a variety of different business people to enhance their presentation. When it came time for feedback, the comments were not all peaches and cream. Some criticisms were that it was four mini presentations in one that were not coherent with each other. As the saying goes, “it is not personal, it’s just business.” This feedback was not to insult the group, but to encourage them to improve. We cannot be “fired” from this class, but we can learn from our mistakes and improve so that we do not make the same errors when we are giving “real” presentations in the “real world.”