It’s totally worth it! – Go Abroad

Ending her studies in Japan on the Student Exchange Program, Phuong Tran shares her final thoughts living and studying in Tokyo. The challenges, the struggles, but also the new unforeseen opportunities that these brought and the better experiences she gained as a result.

I have just returned home and have some time to reflect on my experiences in Japan, I realize that I have failed to accomplish about half of the things I had planned. Am I disappointed? Only a little, because I have gained something else, which is even greater.

My student exchange, of courses, did not include only pleasant experiences. The first upsetting thing occurred to me even before I left the U.S. I was told that the dorm was full, and I had to find accommodation somewhere else. Finding another apartment was not that hard, but the total cost was almost doubled. More importantly, it had made it hard to communicate and hang out with other students who were staying at the dorm. There were times when I could not go to some events because the time and location were not convenient for me. I really wished that I had been accepted into the dorm so that I could have built a stronger bond with other international students.

My second disappointment was about school. When I did my interview for the program, the interviewer asked me what I would do if I could not take all the classes I had planned to take. I said I had another list of classes to substitute. However, that was easier being said that done. During the school orientation, I was kind of panic when being told I could not sign up for the two most-looking-forwarded-to classes, Business Communicating and Business Project, because of the schedule conflicts, my early-return request, and the class’s capacity. I pulled out my substitute list, but again, most of them could not fit into my schedule or not being offered this semester. I ended up taking two random business courses in order to fulfill the credit requirement.

With all those being said, I felt clueless and frustrated in the beginning of the program. Now that I think back, my problem was that I got fixated on a few objectives. Actually, after school started I soon realized I should not have been too worried. I did not have to look hard, new opportunities to learn and adventure came to me one after another. And all of these unforeseen invitations were what made my exchange’s experiences so wonderful.

As I mentioned earlier, I failed to get into my preferred business courses and thought that I could not be able to learn the “business culture” anywhere else. Fortunately, the other courses I got into also emphasized on group work and interactions between cultures. I appreciated that my professors assigned students into groups that had both international and Japanese students. We could not choose to work only with friends, but also new people, especially the ones from completely different cultures. Also, I was able to got a part-time job at school, which taught me the basic Japanese business etiquettes. Furthermore, there were many career events offered to international students either on or off campus. My most favorite one was the visit to Oak Lawn Marketing’s office, during which I could see an actual workplace and even participate in creating the marketing plan for a new product.

My Japanese teacher and classmate. We came from all around the world (France, Australia, Indonesia, Thailand, America, etc)

My Japanese teacher and classmates. We came from all around the world (France, Australia, Indonesia, Thailand, America, etc)

I had to admit that sometimes I felt lonely for staying in an apartment apart from others. However, I have met people whom I want to befriend for life. Also, the International Office at Rikkyo did a wonderful job on keeping us busy. They offered us many opportunities to experience tea ceremony, Ikebana (Japanese flower arrangement), Christmas parties, city tours, etc. After experiencing all of these exciting activities together, it was hard not becoming friends. When I first came to Japan, it took me a long time to get to my apartment carrying a big suitcase by myself, but when I left, my new friends helped me carry my luggage, which had been doubled in size, up to the gate. Just thinking of that made me feel so happy.

A trip to Asakusa with other international students. (The trip was organized by Rikkyo's COBBY group)

A trip to Asakusa with other international students. (The trip was organized by Rikkyo’s COBBY group)

Beside that, staying in an apartment has not only taught me many things about living in Japan but also helped me improve my language skills. In fact, except at school, I only communicated with people in Japanese. If I had stayed at the dorm, there should have been someone I could ask for help, but living alone, I had to deal with all issues by myself. Actually, Rikkyo’s International Office provided many resources to support my life there. However, they were not always available and it took time to arrange a Japanese student to assist me. Thus, I had to go to the city office, bank, etc. by myself to complete all necessary paperwork. My thought was “Lets go see if I can handle this. If I can’t get things done, then I will ask for help later.” I was so worried at first but then I gained more and more confidence in using Japanese. Also, never once I felt I was treated unfairly for not speaking Japanese well. Japanese people are very very friendly and helpful, I can assure you that!

I still think having a clear objective for going abroad is a good thing, but now I believe that keeping an adventurous spirit and being open-minded is more important. In the end, we cannot predict our days in a foreign environment as accurate as when we are home. No need to be obsessed with the plan. My stay in Japan has taught me so, and now I appreciate all the experiences I had over in Japan, even for the unpleasant ones. If I had to talk about the study aboard experiences in only a few words, I would say, “It’s totally worth it.”

About the Author: Phuong Tran, Senior, Accounting and Japanese. Student Exchange Program- Japan.

Professional Interactions in Manchester

With the fortunate opportunity Kevin McGann had meeting with business professionals at Manchester on the Student Exchange Program, he shares his observation on how business is different in England compared to the U.S.

While living in Manchester, I have had the opportunity to further understand the English business culture.  Beyond learning about business practices in my classes, I have had the opportunity to network with English business professionals.  My first chance came when I attended a banquet for North American students this past October.  I arrived with other American exchange students who I had met during my first month in Manchester.  None of us knew what to expect before attending the event, and only knew that food would be provided.  When we arrived, we started conversing with other exchange students from all over the U.S. and Canada.  We talked about how we had been enjoying our time in Manchester so far, but were still getting used to the culture.  All of us missed home to a small extent, but were eager to make travel plans.  It was refreshing to find that a lot of the other American exchange students felt the same way I did after being away for a month.

During this banquet, I was able to speak with a couple of University of Manchester recruiters who gave me some insight into English business culture.  A couple of other American exchange students and I started asking them basic questions about restaurants and other attractions in Manchester.  After this basic small talk about things to do in Manchester, one of the recruiters talked about his business trips to America, and about the differences that he sees in the two cultures.  He mentioned that business professionals in England are more reserved than those in America.  He found the young professionals in America to be more outgoing and more likely to strike up a conversation with someone they don’t know.  I think this observation extends beyond business people and is an accurate distinction between the English and Americans in general.  Despite this difference, he mentioned that he believes that business is conducted in a similar fashion in both countries.

I was also able to speak with one of the generous benefactors who makes exchange at the University of Manchester possible.  I did not know this when I had first approached her and was surprised to find out that she wasn’t a professor.  Speaking with her gave me insight into her reasons for donating to the exchange program specifically.  One of the main reasons that she gave was that she believed that global experiences drastically enhance a student’s education.  She came across as very genuine and interested in hearing about my reasons for choosing to study in Manchester.  Although we only spoke briefly, I am glad that I was able to meet one of the people in Manchester who has allowed me to have the best three months of my life.

My business classes provided insight into how important America is to international business.  I realized this when every single one of my business professors mentioned the U.S. during lecture in a positive business context.  What I concluded from this is that the U.S is an extremely powerful force in the business world.  This could be due to the fact that there are many American corporations are operating abroad.  England is not nearly as relevant in my Fisher classes, but it is difficult to say whether this is due to a lack of large companies in England or a more U.S. focused curriculum.  One way in which I was able to see how business is conducted in England is through shopping. Every grocery store that I shopped at charged people for grocery bags.  This encouraged people to bring their own.  Although this is minor, I think that it demonstrates the environmental awareness in England’s business community.  Another small difference that I noticed was that British stores are much smaller.  There are less one stop shop places in England, which made weekly grocery shopping more challenging.

Business Exposure in Japan at the OLM DAY 2015 Event

Phuong Tran shares her experience, attending the OLMDay2015 event in Tokyo, while she studies in Japan on the Student Exchange Program. She expanded professional networks and got insight of Japanese business, all thanks to being awarded one of Japans’ Bridging Scholarships.

I considered myself lucky for being one of the recipients of the Bridging Scholarships, which was funded by various private foundations and major U.S. corporations. The best thing about receiving this scholarship was that I received not only financial aids but also opportunities to attend professional events during my time in Japan. Back in December 2015, I was invited to participate in the OLMDAY2015 event at Oak Lawn Marketing’s office in Toranomon, Tokyo. The OLMDay2015 event was sponsored by Oak Lawn Marketing Inc., and offered to American students who received an OLM scholarship through the United States-Japan Bridging Foundation for studying in Japan.

During the event, me and three other students were given an introduction presentation on the company’s background and business, a tour around their office, and had hand-on experience through a marketing workshop, and then a meeting with President Hill.

I was really thankful for this opportunity because this was my first time to visit a Japanese company and talk to the employees who were actually working there. I also appreciated the fact that some of the staffs were from other countries, so they were able to give me an insight on what kind of jobs that foreigners (like myself) could do in Japan, and how they fit in the company’s culture.

The marketing workshop was very fun and exciting. After being introduced to the company’s marketing philosophy “Before After After,” we were divided into groups to create a marketing plan for a “product that is not available on the Japanese market yet” under the guidance of the OLM staffs. We had only about 20 minutes to prepare, which made me very nervous, but the OLM staffs were very friendly and helpful. Everyone in the team had a chance to express our ideas and was willing to do that. We collaborated very well even though we did not know each other before.  Then we presented our plan to the marketing director and received feedback from him.

The experience that had the most impact on me was the meeting with Mr. Hill, a very passionate businessman from America. I asked him about the company’s participation in the post-disaster recovery because the incident was one of many things that had ignited my interest in Japan. Back in 2011, I watched news about the situation in Japan and was impressed on how Japanese citizens got together in order to overcome the disaster. However, I was impressed at how the president addressed the issue from the viewpoint of a businessman. According to him, one of OLM’s significant contributions in reviving the economy in the area was continuing their business and creating jobs. I agreed with Mr. Hill that businesses should aim for profit even in such situation, and by doing that they could benefit the whole community.

The visit was very helpful for me as well as other students since we were all interested in working in Japan in the future. The staff was very friendly and answered all of our concerns about working in Japan, such as over-time work and how to communicate with other Japanese co-workers. From my observation, Oak Lawn had a diverse and American-like culture, especially in their Sales and Marketing branches, which was understandable since the company was founded and directed by an American. I sometimes felt concerned about whether or not I could actually work in a Japanese company, but after this visit, I felt like I had an idea about what to look for in a company in the future.

On the other hand, I feel that we were busy with many things to do in such a short amount of time. I wish we had more time to sit down and have conversations with the OLM staffs. Nevertheless, OLMDAY2015 was a wonderful experience, and I appreciated the company for providing me this opportunity to learn about business in Japan.

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OLM’s office and my team during the marketing workshop.

The event was also reported on the company’s website here.

About the Author: Phuong Tran, Senior, Accounting and Japanese. Student Exchange Program- Japan.

Business So Casual

Observe the difference in the business world between the U.S. and Denmark as Kelley Jiang talks about some of the business related events and etiquettes that she have experienced during her Student Exchange Program at Copenhagen Business School- Denmark in Autumn 2015.

This may be a little bit of a continuation off my other post about what the education system is like in Denmark since Copenhagen Business School is indeed a business school, but this post will focus more on the business world in Denmark and what my reactions were after attending some networking and workshop events here.

Because most of us have grown up living the majority of our lives in America we are more familiar with how business is done in the U.S. Business news is centered around milestones, progress, and mishaps that are relevant to America. There is a business “world” in America, that has standards of how to give a good presentation, how to dress business casual verses business professional, etiquette for interviews and business meetings, or how to give an effective elevator pitch. Although I have learned in the classroom that globalization is slowly universalizing the world, especially when it comes to business, after spending just a couple of months in Copenhagen, Denmark I have come across some surprising differences between the business “world” here and the business “world” in America. These differences lead me to conclude that globalization still has some work to do.

The differences I have noticed in how business is conducted in Copenhagen are found in many areas of business including giving a sales pitch, case study competitions, and social media presence.

But one of the major, overarching differences I want to first address before going into the other differences I have just listed is an extension of one of the major, overarching differences I described in my previous post about the educational system in Copenhagen: casualness. The casualness and open atmosphere in the classroom extend into the way business professionals present themselves and their companies to potential future employees or us CBS students. I have grown up with the image of a man in a three-piece suit carrying a briefcase and acting/speaking in an extremely formal manner imprinted into what I perceive to be a typical businessman. I see it in shows, movies, my parents, and the people that surround me in every day life back home. I see men and women dressed like this on my way to school as they are on their way to work and I watched for 18 years as my dad dressed in a button up and tie every day for work. At first, when I noticed there were significantly fewer people dressed like this in Copenhagen, I thought that the business world was just smaller in Copenhagen—maybe this city is not as business orientated as the cities I have lived in in the past. But I soon realized that these “business people” were everywhere but they just didn’t dress up every day. I actually found that there were more students at CBS who would dress in, in my opinion, nice business clothes than if you were to wander around the city center during the average week day.

Also, after attending a start-up pitch presentation, I was again astonished at the level of casualness that was exhibited during the networking event. The point of this event was for start-up companies to promote their company and recruit students to complete an internship with them. First, we had to reserve seats in the auditorium to ensure that there would be enough seats for everyone. But instead of checking for your ticket upon entrance, the organizers merely left the doors to the auditorium open for whoever would like to come. The auditorium did not overflow like I expected it would because of the lack of ticket checking. It was like there was a strongly valued honor system in place. Also, there was no dress code for the presenters and especially no dress code for the students attending the event.

After the presentations began I was again surprised that each person was only given three minutes to present their company and they were timed down to the second! This formality stood out like a sore thumb among all the casual vibes I had been getting right when I walked through those un-manned auditorium doors. But back to the topic of being casual, the presenters had all different types of presentations: ranging from the traditional PowerPoint presentation to just a verbal presentation. I found it strange how each presenter chose to use his/her precious three minutes and startling at how “start-up” some of the companies were—one had not even been successfully launched yet! One company spent two minutes of their time showing a promo video for their company which left little time to talk about what type of opportunities there were at their company for us while another dressed up in a costume to show how much fun their company has while another even showed an extremely explicit photo of a previous intern also in order to show the “fun” factor of working for their company. I left the event feeling extremely confused and still am today when I reflect back on the experience, because I could not figure out if I had just attended an extremely uniquely set up for a start-up pitch session or Denmark’s structure of recruiting interns just highly contrasted what I have been used to in the US.

My friends and I also participated in a case competition run by an organization at CBS called My Marketing Lab. The organization teamed with the famous Danish beer company, Carlsberg, to put together a marketing problem for students to solve. I began the competition thinking that we had a real shot at winning because of the diversity represented among our group: two Americans, an Australian, and a Canadian that studies in Scotland. But after reflecting back on the experience it seems that we tackled the marketing problem unconsciously through the lens of our own culture. It was an easy mistake considering our own culture and people have been all that we have known until now. Our case was not presented to a panel of judges but submitted simply via PowerPoint, which was totally foreign and made no sense to me. In previous case competitions, I have always been asked to prepare a presentation to an audience with a question and answer panel to follow. I found it extremely hard to communicate our message the way we wanted through just a submission of a PowerPoint presentation.

Last, from being on the social media and marketing committee for an organization at CBS called CBS Coffee I am able to learn more about the culture and marketing opportunities in the Danish market. My first and most important lesson was that Twitter is not relevant here, but instead everything revolves around Facebook. As a person who checks her Twitter feed at least twice as much as Facebook, this was jaw-dropping news. Also, the market for Instagram has recently begun to grow, which was surprising to me as well, because I would not consider Instagram a new social media platform in America.

In conclusion, I realize that although I have learned a lot about the professional world in Copenhagen, I can’t solidify what I have learned just yet because my experiences here have only been dipping my toes in the waters. I can’t think that all start-up pitches are like the ones that I heard in that one event and I can’t expect every case competition set up to be similar to the one that I participated in. Making the generalization would be a mistake and most likely unreflective of Copenhagen as a whole.

But even though I cannot make generalizations based off my experiences so far, it is evident to me that there are definitely major differences between Danish business and American business even with all the globalization in the world.

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About the Author: Kelley Jiang, Junior, Marketing, Student Exchange Program- Denmark

Please Hire Me! – The Career Fair Struggle

Senior year Student Exchange participant, Jayna Wolfe, jumps into an Italian Career Fair to gain a better understanding of what the career competition is like in Italy at one of Europe’s top business schools, Bocconi University.

This past week I had the unique opportunity to attend the Bocconi & Jobs Career Fair Event that is hosted by Bocconi University once every semester. Excited for the incredibly relevant opportunity to see for myself what an Italian career fair might be like I dug the high heel shoes I have been neglecting and the fancy blazer out from the back of my closet.

The event runs from 10AM-5PM and is an exclusive occasion during which major Italian and international employers meet with students, graduates, and Specialized Master holders from the University. About 90 companies attended this year’s event and 40 of those companies were featured in 30 minute presentations during which recruiters described their company profile, organization, available internship and placement opportunities, and the selection processes. Most of the presentations were offered in English and some in Italian, another reminder of how lucky we are that English is the “international language.” A majority of the companies who attend the career fair require their employees to have sufficient proficiency in the English language. I was fortunate to have availability in my schedule to sit in on three of the company presentations- KIKO Milano, Procter & Gamble, and BlackRock, Inc.

KIKO Milano is a leading Italian cosmetics retailer currently operating in 12 markets across the world. KIKO is one of Antonio Percassi’s mono-brand retailers and currently operates over 700 stores worldwide. After its foundation in 1997 and almost a decade of brand establishment, KIKO opened its first retail store in Italy in 2005. The KIKO representatives began the information session by focusing on the brand and growth of the company over the last decade. The second half of the session was devoted to providing information about corporate job opportunities at KIKO’s headquarters in Bergamo, a city about 40 kilometers northeast of Milan. As a company focused on expanding their global presence and constantly looking for other growth opportunities, KIKO recruits in two main directions, retail and corporate staffing. I found it interesting that despite their rapid expansion there are only about 350 employees at the corporate headquarters in Bergamo, a promising sign for Bocconi students interested in career opportunities with KIKO Milano.

Overall, it was great to hear about an Italian company and the types of candidates the company is seeking. KIKO requires an initial interview, meeting with the line director of the position you are interested in, online assessment, and an English test. English fluency is a requirement in all departments except accounting. The ideal candidate is dynamic, with a great attitude and fashion sense, and an international mindset. Definitely a great opportunity for someone looking to work in an industry heavily involved with international markets.

I was particularly excited to hear the Proctor & Gamble presentation because the company has such a strong presence on OSU’s campus and I have previously had the opportunity to participate in P&G information sessions with some of the student organizations I am involved with. The four recruiters that presented during the P&G session based the thirty minutes around one central question “Are you ready to be the next P&G top manager?” After touching on why P&G is the place to be and identifying their ideal candidate the “Top Manager” event was explained to the group. Basically a fast track to growth opportunities, the “Top Manager” event and “P&G Group Case Competition” give students the chance to show off their talents and improve the likelihood of earning a job offer. Very interesting and reminiscent of case competitions at Ohio State.

BlackRock, Inc. was one of the final presentations of the day and I wanted to give myself a chance to hear what a financial company had to say, as finance is something I’m newly exposed to in my Corporate Finance course this semester. BlackRock is a multinational investment management corporation based in New York City and the company is the world’s largest asset manager. The presenter was fabulously British and instead of speaking specifically about BlackRock, used her time as a skills session on interviews and assessment centers. The focus was on the do’s and don’ts of interviewing and CV’s (AKA resumes, for some reason all of Europe and the UK uses this term) and how to nail an interview. The moral of my 30 minutes- Prep yourself before you wreck yourself.

General Observations About the Career Fair:

  • The students were not dressed in “business professional” (surprising for a university of primarily business students and Europe’s top business school). Recruiters at the career fair were dressed in their normal professional attire, but it seemed to me that only a handful of the students who might have been interviewing were truly dressed in suits. I believe this might have something to do with the culture and the nature of professionalism required at the Bocconi career fair. Maybe these students not dressed up were simply interested in preparing themselves for future opportunities rather than seriously dropping off resumes and hoping for interviews.
    • At Fisher you would not be permitted to enter in jeans and a hoody carrying your backpack.
  • Company information sessions took place during the career fair
    • Usually these take place as independent events organized by career services, or are hosted by Fisher student organizations during weekly meetings
  • Students as well as alumni are permitted to attend the career fair up to 3 years after graduating from Bocconi
    • Fisher students must be enrolled to attend the career fair
  • Almost as if hosting an on-campus event some of the companies were handing out goody bags of sample items
    • I’ve never received more than a fancy pen with the company’s name on it from a career fair at Fisher (maybe I just haven’t talked to the right people)

Overall, I believe the career fair was fairly similar to those I have attended at Ohio State. It was definitely smaller in scale, but similar in the way that students were approaching stands of companies they were interested in with hopes of dropping resumes with the recruiters. The approach to recruiting also seems to be similar with interviews, resumes, and general communication between recruiters and students. However, in general the opportunities presented at the career fair span far beyond the borders of Italy. Students at a Bocconi career fair are much more likely to encounter job offers in other parts of Europe and the UK depending on the companies they approach. Although companies that recruit in the U.S. offer some opportunities abroad they do not typically start new employees at international locations (at least from my experience). This is definitely the result of the way in which European countries operate as a whole with a standardized currency and similar employment laws.

Much like back home, students at Bocconi are constantly looking for ways to get ahead in their future business careers. Despite the competitive environment I was surprised that more of my peers in the exchange program were not determined to suit up, attend the company presentations, and get face-time with international recruiters. I think it is easy to get caught up in the allure of traveling while you are an exchange student, and although I have loved every second of exploring new places with my friends, I think it is also important to remember why we are here. We are here because we are competitive business students who have the desire to explore the world in which we live beyond the borders of our home country. We are here because we had the drive and motivation to apply for a competitive program that we believe will open the doors to opportunities beyond an undergraduate degree. I am absolutely proud and blessed to be here.

As a fourth year student planning to graduate in the spring I am beginning to struggle with the idea that I will be making a decision about full-time employment in the coming months. On one side of the spectrum there are people who tell you to work hard, always keep your eye out for the next opportunity, and never be afraid to try new things. On the other side there is encouragement to relax, after all, you’ll only ever be 21 in Europe with the world at your fingertips once. Ohio State and Fisher College of Business have taught me to work hard, always. I am not the type of person who is pleased with doing average, and can sometimes be too critical of myself. I am excited to return to OSU and figure out what my next steps after graduation will be, but for now I think the best advice I can give myself, or anyone else who might be in a similar situation would be- use this precious time to make memories and have experiences that will build you up when you sit down to write a cover letter, perfect your resume, and prepare for an interview. Not everyone is ok with leaving their home country for 4 months, and not everyone will get the chance– recognize the opportunities you have here and now and take advantage of them.

Until next time!

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About the Author: Jayna Wolfe, Senior, Logistics Management. Student Exchange Program- Italy.

Job Hunting While Abroad

Searching for a Full Time job in the United States while abroad started out as perhaps one of the most difficult challenges I’ve ever had to face. As I entered my Consulting Major at Audencia Ecole de Management, I thought that I might want to pursue a career in consulting. While the major showed me that this wasn’t a field I wanted to enter into directly, it equipped me with a lot of great skills for presenting and case interviews.

Additionally, I applied for a few interviews via FisherConnect, and with the help of Mark Wilson from Fisher’s IT Department, was able to Skype interview from abroad. All of the interviewers commended Fisher for making it so easy for them, and I also appreciate the time they dedicated to ensuring my interviews went smoothly. It was nice to always see the familiar face of Mr. Wilson before I went forward with my interviews!

Overall, the process definitely had some added stresses, but Fisher’s resources made it much easier to apply and get in contact with companies. I also sought out a few companies outside of the ones that normally recruit at Fisher, and found the process to go smoothly. Some companies did request to send me back to the United Staes for a second round interview, which certainly made the process more difficult. Others, offered to interview me when I returned in December.

Audencia Ecole de Management offers a number of resources for job hunting, including resume reviews in both English and French. The school also has its own job fair, called the Audencia Forum, in early October. These jobs are typically in Europe, and more specifically, France. Currently, I would like to work in the States, so I neglected to attend. However, there were many top companies such as Ernst & Young, Amazon, and Unilever. If you are planning to apply abroad, it is imporant to note that they use a different format for resumes (CVs).

My advice for anyone who is wondering about studying abroad in the semester while they are seraching for jobs, is to go for it. The path ahead will require a lot of research before you leave, and it will make things more complicated, but I definitely believe it is worth it. So many of my interviewers commented on how they loved their study abroad semesters, or wished they had gone abroad during their undergrad. I’m happy to report that I have accepted a full time offer, and have gotten to enjoy this semester to the fullest, even with the pressure of the job hunt!

The (Not So) Hidden Benefits of Studying Abroad

It’s no secret that when you study abroad you get to see a different part of the world and experience so many new things that you never expected. What I didn’t realize was just how much I would get to see when I left Ohio at the end of August.  Not only have I gotten the opportunity to explore Germany and the area around where WHU is located, I have been able to travel to places that I’ve always wanted to visit.

This past weekend I travelled to Amsterdam and was able to see the Anne Frank house, something that I’ve wanted to do since I was in 3rd grade. I’ve also been able to hike in the Swiss Alps, see where the Sound of Music was filmed, visit Oktoberfest in Munich, the Berlin wall, Westminster Abbey, castles in Cardiff and so much more!  I never dreamed of being able to visit so many cities in such a short amount of time or see things that I’ve been reading about for years. Next stop is a tour of Italy where I get to hike to the top of Mount Vesuvius!

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At the East Side Gallery in Berlin

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In the mountains of Engelberg, Switzerland

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Castle in Cardiff, Wales

Yet another benefit that I didn’t realize before I studied abroad was how much these experiences are helping me prepare for future jobs and interviews. Just the other day there was a huge train strike in Germany and I couldn’t get home from where I was travelling and ended up having to find an alternate route home. I used this experience as a positive example of how I could adapt to change and respond under pressure in a skype interview a few days later; the recruiters loved that I had such unique experience and that I was able to incorporate seeing different pieces of the world into my education.

The people you meet while travelling have also been so interesting and something that was completely unexpected. There is such a variety of people in the accommodations I used at all these different places, from people in their mid-20s who quit their jobs to travel Europe for 9 months, to fellow study abroad students, to people from half-way around the world. The diversity is endless and such a wonderfully unexpected part of study abroad because you get to hear the world views of so many people.

There are many more benefits waiting to be discovered and I can’t wait to find every one of them!

An Introduction to Taking Whiskey Global

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This summer I am interning at Cleveland Whiskey through The Ohio Export Internship Program. My main project has been to create a “standard operating procedure” for exporting Cleveland Whiskey. I have been working on this in hopes that, when the company receives international inquiries, they will have a standard protocol to follow.

My work has primarily consisted of researching potential markets, creating document templates, and attempting to make sense of legal regulations. I’ve also been working local events and learning as much as I can about the business and the industry.

One of my favorite things about working for Cleveland Whiskey has been seeing people react positively to the brand.  It’s been exciting to work for a small company that has such a tremendous amount of potential. The current state of the global market for whiskey shows the implications of this potential for the work I’ve been doing.

Cleveland Whiskey is a newcomer in the twenty-five billion dollar premium whiskey industry.  Whiskey is an affordable luxury, not just in North America, but throughout the world. Bourbon and whiskey markets are flourishing and the demand for premium spirits is outpacing growth. In 2013 alone, bourbon demand increased by approximately 7%. Numerous suppliers have publicly stated that their supply will not be able to keep up with this growing demand. Cleveland Whiskey has a solution to this problem.

Typical whiskey production takes eight to twelve years to produce a class of properly aged bourbon. Cleveland Whiskey can produce comparably proper bourbon in less than one week using an accelerated aging process. This allows Cleveland Whiskey to increase their production to meet immediate needs while other companies must wait for their bourbon to reach a birthday before they can meet demands.  The ability to produce virtually unlimited amounts of high quality bourbon enables the company to be positioned well not only throughout the United States, but through many markets across the world.

With an impending international whiskey shortage due to increases in consumption and lagging production, Cleveland Whiskey has serious potential to penetrate new markets using its disruptive technology.

As exciting as all this information is, my focus has been on finding the best way to get Cleveland Whiskey ten feet outside of the distillery door. Exporting is a complicated business. Between the regulations, documentation, and complex logistics there are a lot of things to consider before committing to an international offer. The challenge so far has been to patiently prepare for a calculated entrance into the global whiskey market without getting distracted by all the enthusiasm surrounding the industry.

Off to Ethiopia!

Seven Master of Business Administration students from Ohio State’s Fisher College of Business will visit Ethiopia for three weeks in May as the in-country portion of our Global Applied Projects class. The class is taught by Kurt Roush and advised by Professor Scott Livengood.

We are: Javed Cheema, Katie Fornadel, Carla Garver, Alejandra Iberico Lozada, Daniel Meisterman, Niraj Patel, and me, Danielle Latman. Combined, we are from three different countries, have traveled to almost 70 countries, and have 65 years experience in sales, marketing, operations, financial services, nonprofit and military industries.

The Ohio State / Ethiopia One Health Partnership asked us to harness our business skills to help operationalize the partnership’s rabies elimination project, adding a layer of practical implementation to the research and training that veterinarians and scientists have already developed. We have split up into teams focusing on the finance, marketing, operations, logistics and data collection functions of the rabies elimination project. Our goal is to develop a proposed roadmap that will allow the U.S. and Ethiopian partners to implement the rabies elimination One Health model project on a targeted region in Ethiopia.

We will travel to Ethiopia from May 1-25 to work with officials in Addis Ababa and Gondar. For the past seven weeks, we have met with the CDC, Drs. Gebreyes and O’Quinn, cultural anthropologists and social service agencies to prepare for our trip. We have also eaten at the lovely Lalibela restaurant here in Columbus, received our travel visas, and gotten a lot of shots — and were dismayed to find a shortage of the yellow fever vaccine in the U.S.!

For all of us, this will be our first time visiting Ethiopia and sub-Saharan Africa in general, and we are excited for what are sure to be many new and rich experiences! We are looking forward to exploring the natural environment of the Blue Nile Falls and Simien Mountains, driving overland from Addis Ababa to Gondar, seeing the history of ancient castles and churches, visiting marketplaces and drinking delicious coffee with each other and our new colleagues and neighbors. We are thrilled for the opportunity to contribute our business skills and passion to build on the One Health Partnership’s success and help eliminate rabies in Ethiopia.

From left: Katie Fornadel, Alejandra Iberico Lozada, Daniel Meisterman, Danielle Latman, Niraj Patel and Carla Garver. Not pictured: Javed Cheema.

From left: Katie Fornadel, Alejandra Iberico Lozada, Daniel Meisterman, Danielle Latman, Niraj Patel and Carla Garver. Not pictured: Javed Cheema.

Job hunting season at Rikkyo

The job hunting season in Japan is quite different from that in the US. Most colleges students in Japan tend to finish their study when they get the bachelor’s degree and start to work in companies, rather than entering a graduate school. Therefore, college students have to start their job hunting process in their junior year, and most of the students will find jobs before their graduation.

My Japanese classmates and professors at Rikkyo University told me that the Junior year is the busiest year for students because of the pressure to find a job. Also, the chance to get a job after graduation is very low for college students in Japan.

The year arrangement in Japan is also different from the US. The school year always starts in April or May, so the autumn semester is the last semester in their Junior year. The job hunting season this year started in November. So it is very common to see students wearing suits walking in the Rikkyo campus starting November.