Job Hunting While Abroad

Searching for a Full Time job in the United States while abroad started out as perhaps one of the most difficult challenges I’ve ever had to face. As I entered my Consulting Major at Audencia Ecole de Management, I thought that I might want to pursue a career in consulting. While the major showed me that this wasn’t a field I wanted to enter into directly, it equipped me with a lot of great skills for presenting and case interviews.

Additionally, I applied for a few interviews via FisherConnect, and with the help of Mark Wilson from Fisher’s IT Department, was able to Skype interview from abroad. All of the interviewers commended Fisher for making it so easy for them, and I also appreciate the time they dedicated to ensuring my interviews went smoothly. It was nice to always see the familiar face of Mr. Wilson before I went forward with my interviews!

Overall, the process definitely had some added stresses, but Fisher’s resources made it much easier to apply and get in contact with companies. I also sought out a few companies outside of the ones that normally recruit at Fisher, and found the process to go smoothly. Some companies did request to send me back to the United Staes for a second round interview, which certainly made the process more difficult. Others, offered to interview me when I returned in December.

Audencia Ecole de Management offers a number of resources for job hunting, including resume reviews in both English and French. The school also has its own job fair, called the Audencia Forum, in early October. These jobs are typically in Europe, and more specifically, France. Currently, I would like to work in the States, so I neglected to attend. However, there were many top companies such as Ernst & Young, Amazon, and Unilever. If you are planning to apply abroad, it is imporant to note that they use a different format for resumes (CVs).

My advice for anyone who is wondering about studying abroad in the semester while they are seraching for jobs, is to go for it. The path ahead will require a lot of research before you leave, and it will make things more complicated, but I definitely believe it is worth it. So many of my interviewers commented on how they loved their study abroad semesters, or wished they had gone abroad during their undergrad. I’m happy to report that I have accepted a full time offer, and have gotten to enjoy this semester to the fullest, even with the pressure of the job hunt!

The (Not So) Hidden Benefits of Studying Abroad

It’s no secret that when you study abroad you get to see a different part of the world and experience so many new things that you never expected. What I didn’t realize was just how much I would get to see when I left Ohio at the end of August.  Not only have I gotten the opportunity to explore Germany and the area around where WHU is located, I have been able to travel to places that I’ve always wanted to visit.

This past weekend I travelled to Amsterdam and was able to see the Anne Frank house, something that I’ve wanted to do since I was in 3rd grade. I’ve also been able to hike in the Swiss Alps, see where the Sound of Music was filmed, visit Oktoberfest in Munich, the Berlin wall, Westminster Abbey, castles in Cardiff and so much more!  I never dreamed of being able to visit so many cities in such a short amount of time or see things that I’ve been reading about for years. Next stop is a tour of Italy where I get to hike to the top of Mount Vesuvius!

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At the East Side Gallery in Berlin

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In the mountains of Engelberg, Switzerland

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Castle in Cardiff, Wales

Yet another benefit that I didn’t realize before I studied abroad was how much these experiences are helping me prepare for future jobs and interviews. Just the other day there was a huge train strike in Germany and I couldn’t get home from where I was travelling and ended up having to find an alternate route home. I used this experience as a positive example of how I could adapt to change and respond under pressure in a skype interview a few days later; the recruiters loved that I had such unique experience and that I was able to incorporate seeing different pieces of the world into my education.

The people you meet while travelling have also been so interesting and something that was completely unexpected. There is such a variety of people in the accommodations I used at all these different places, from people in their mid-20s who quit their jobs to travel Europe for 9 months, to fellow study abroad students, to people from half-way around the world. The diversity is endless and such a wonderfully unexpected part of study abroad because you get to hear the world views of so many people.

There are many more benefits waiting to be discovered and I can’t wait to find every one of them!

An Introduction to Taking Whiskey Global


This summer I am interning at Cleveland Whiskey through The Ohio Export Internship Program. My main project has been to create a “standard operating procedure” for exporting Cleveland Whiskey. I have been working on this in hopes that, when the company receives international inquiries, they will have a standard protocol to follow.

My work has primarily consisted of researching potential markets, creating document templates, and attempting to make sense of legal regulations. I’ve also been working local events and learning as much as I can about the business and the industry.

One of my favorite things about working for Cleveland Whiskey has been seeing people react positively to the brand.  It’s been exciting to work for a small company that has such a tremendous amount of potential. The current state of the global market for whiskey shows the implications of this potential for the work I’ve been doing.

Cleveland Whiskey is a newcomer in the twenty-five billion dollar premium whiskey industry.  Whiskey is an affordable luxury, not just in North America, but throughout the world. Bourbon and whiskey markets are flourishing and the demand for premium spirits is outpacing growth. In 2013 alone, bourbon demand increased by approximately 7%. Numerous suppliers have publicly stated that their supply will not be able to keep up with this growing demand. Cleveland Whiskey has a solution to this problem.

Typical whiskey production takes eight to twelve years to produce a class of properly aged bourbon. Cleveland Whiskey can produce comparably proper bourbon in less than one week using an accelerated aging process. This allows Cleveland Whiskey to increase their production to meet immediate needs while other companies must wait for their bourbon to reach a birthday before they can meet demands.  The ability to produce virtually unlimited amounts of high quality bourbon enables the company to be positioned well not only throughout the United States, but through many markets across the world.

With an impending international whiskey shortage due to increases in consumption and lagging production, Cleveland Whiskey has serious potential to penetrate new markets using its disruptive technology.

As exciting as all this information is, my focus has been on finding the best way to get Cleveland Whiskey ten feet outside of the distillery door. Exporting is a complicated business. Between the regulations, documentation, and complex logistics there are a lot of things to consider before committing to an international offer. The challenge so far has been to patiently prepare for a calculated entrance into the global whiskey market without getting distracted by all the enthusiasm surrounding the industry.

Off to Ethiopia!

Seven Master of Business Administration students from Ohio State’s Fisher College of Business will visit Ethiopia for three weeks in May as the in-country portion of our Global Applied Projects class. The class is taught by Kurt Roush and advised by Professor Scott Livengood.

We are: Javed Cheema, Katie Fornadel, Carla Garver, Alejandra Iberico Lozada, Daniel Meisterman, Niraj Patel, and me, Danielle Latman. Combined, we are from three different countries, have traveled to almost 70 countries, and have 65 years experience in sales, marketing, operations, financial services, nonprofit and military industries.

The Ohio State / Ethiopia One Health Partnership asked us to harness our business skills to help operationalize the partnership’s rabies elimination project, adding a layer of practical implementation to the research and training that veterinarians and scientists have already developed. We have split up into teams focusing on the finance, marketing, operations, logistics and data collection functions of the rabies elimination project. Our goal is to develop a proposed roadmap that will allow the U.S. and Ethiopian partners to implement the rabies elimination One Health model project on a targeted region in Ethiopia.

We will travel to Ethiopia from May 1-25 to work with officials in Addis Ababa and Gondar. For the past seven weeks, we have met with the CDC, Drs. Gebreyes and O’Quinn, cultural anthropologists and social service agencies to prepare for our trip. We have also eaten at the lovely Lalibela restaurant here in Columbus, received our travel visas, and gotten a lot of shots — and were dismayed to find a shortage of the yellow fever vaccine in the U.S.!

For all of us, this will be our first time visiting Ethiopia and sub-Saharan Africa in general, and we are excited for what are sure to be many new and rich experiences! We are looking forward to exploring the natural environment of the Blue Nile Falls and Simien Mountains, driving overland from Addis Ababa to Gondar, seeing the history of ancient castles and churches, visiting marketplaces and drinking delicious coffee with each other and our new colleagues and neighbors. We are thrilled for the opportunity to contribute our business skills and passion to build on the One Health Partnership’s success and help eliminate rabies in Ethiopia.

From left: Katie Fornadel, Alejandra Iberico Lozada, Daniel Meisterman, Danielle Latman, Niraj Patel and Carla Garver. Not pictured: Javed Cheema.

From left: Katie Fornadel, Alejandra Iberico Lozada, Daniel Meisterman, Danielle Latman, Niraj Patel and Carla Garver. Not pictured: Javed Cheema.

Job hunting season at Rikkyo

The job hunting season in Japan is quite different from that in the US. Most colleges students in Japan tend to finish their study when they get the bachelor’s degree and start to work in companies, rather than entering a graduate school. Therefore, college students have to start their job hunting process in their junior year, and most of the students will find jobs before their graduation.

My Japanese classmates and professors at Rikkyo University told me that the Junior year is the busiest year for students because of the pressure to find a job. Also, the chance to get a job after graduation is very low for college students in Japan.

The year arrangement in Japan is also different from the US. The school year always starts in April or May, so the autumn semester is the last semester in their Junior year. The job hunting season this year started in November. So it is very common to see students wearing suits walking in the Rikkyo campus starting November.

Impact of Going Abroad

Studying abroad with Fisher has been one of the highlights of my college experience. In our short time of 11 days we were able to see and experience so many things. I had previously studied abroad in high school with my senior Spanish class to Costa Rica to experience the culture and language. This immersion was entirely different. The business component is what made this trip. Being able to speak in my native language, English, to global business professionals is something that simply could not be done in a normal classroom at Ohio State.

This experience opened my eyes to just how connected the world is today. We were able to meet Ohio University band students and directors who were playing at the Vatican, an English teacher from my hometown of Dayton (Ohio), and plenty of Michigan and OSU fans. In a single restaurant in Italy we met people from Denmark, Romania, Italy, Finland, England, Spain, Brazil, Germany, and France. In one single restaurant. These were just people my own age that we spoke to. It was unbelievable.

Our classroom discussions were reinforced daily in real life discussions. While we were discussing the European Union with one of the representatives I remembered tidbits of information that Melissa had taught us in class. This was classroom learning implemented in the truest form. We were using knowledge learned from a book to speak with someone who actually worked in the EU! It was phenomenal. It made the learning experience so much more real and beneficial.

One interesting fact I remembered from the class is a woman that was mentioned who ran a business making gluten-free dough. Surprisingly, most of her business was overseas through exporting. Today’s world is so much more different than it was thirty years ago. It’s hard to believe a woman can make a living selling dough by shipping it all over the world as opposed to a conventional bakery.

After going abroad with Fisher I am much more interested in International Business. Although my major is Finance I definitely plan to look into career opportunities that may allow international travel opportunities. It would be amazing to find a job with a global corporation that would allow me to meet with colleagues in other countries.

The benefits of going abroad are not only academic and professional. Some of my best friends at Ohio State are Global Lab students that I never met before this trip. We bonded in the class time and overseas. Not only that, but the friendships we have made will surely be valuable someday. We are all Fisher Direct Honors students. When we returned in the fall and visited the involvement fair I saw more Global Lab students than any of my other friends. We were all there representing different organizations! Whether it was the running club, or a fraternity or sorority, or the Undergraduate Finance Association, so many of us were there. The students who went on this trip with me are some of the best, brightest, and most involved in Fisher. There is no doubt that we are all headed toward bright futures.


How Firm Thy Friendship O-H-I-O