Tips and Tricks to Maximize your Experience in Spain!

Tips and tricks for studying abroad in Spain! Junior Alex Jackson reflects on her Summer Global Internship experience.

It has been a couple weeks since I have been back from my Summer in Spain, and I already miss it! The people, activities, and of course the food, more specifically the 4 for 1∊ croissants you could get at any bakery. I also miss being with the other students in the internship. We were able to get so close to each other, I will at least get to see most of them when I am back on campus. However after reflecting on my trip, and sleeping for two days straight,  I want to give you all a couple tips for when you also go abroad for the summer:

  1. Always find the nearest McDonald’s to your home. It can be a nice reminder of the United States when you get homesick and it tastes way better than it does back in America. McDonald’s also is one of the only places that has public restrooms because sometimes you have to pay to use them in Europe.
  2. Travel! Whether you travel around Spain or to other countries it is a great experience. Just think, when is the next time you will be able to travel to this many places in a short amount of time. It also makes you more global and it a great conversation starter with companies!
  3. Try to speak Spanish as much as possible. Even if you do not know a lick of Spanish, it helps you immerse yourself in the culture. It also let’s your co-workers know you are trying and interested in the culture. Even if you just pick up a few words and phrases it is worth it!
  4. Keep an open mind! This may be one of the only times that you are in an entirely different country. Keep an open mind about the food, people, and culture in general. Be open to trying new things and if you get a chance just talk to random people! Talking to people around your age they can show you the non-touristy things to do and take you to some great restaurants.
  5. Have fun! Yes you are in a new country, meeting new people, and working a new job and it can get monotonous at times. However, you have to make the most of the trip while you are there. Do not be lazy when you are tired after work and someone asks you to go somewhere because you never know when you will be back!

Overall, this trip was worth it! Not only was I able to become a world traveler, but I gained so many friends from the trip, to hang out and study with when I came back to Fisher. There were many scholarships I applied to so I could get the cost down such as the FCOB Global Experience Scholarship the ODI Education Abroad Scholarship, these both helped to fund the trip. I was able to get real world business experience abroad, and not many people can say they have done that. Recruiters have been impressed with my experience, because not only did I work broad but I was able to make a considerable contribution to Fundación Aladina. I also gained many transferable skills, that helped me answer behavioral questions during interviews. As a bonus, the internship abroad also makes a great fun fact for when you come back to campus. I would recommend this trip to anyone and I am sure, if you follow these tips, you will have just as great of a trip as I did!   

Spain: The Finale

That’s a wrap! Junior Alex Jackson reflects on her final week in Spain and her final work presentation on the Summer Global Internship Program.

I only have one week left in Spain and I am going back to visit my favorite places as well as visit anywhere I have not been. It is kind of bittersweet being in my last week of the trip because I have made new friends, memories, and gotten business experience, but I cannot wait to see my family!

Everyday after work I would go a do a different activity that I enjoyed doing in Spain! One day, I went to Parque Retiro. It is so beautiful and peaceful there, plus there are a ton of people just enjoying their time in the park. My friends and I rented one of the row boats and spent an hour rowing around in the park’s pond. It was very fun, but there are fish that jump in that pond, so it was sometimes a little scary because you did not know if they were able to jump into the boat. On another day, I went shopping for myself and friends back at home. In Spain, they had an entire week of sales up to 60% off in all the stores to try to get rid of the summer clothing. I was able to buy cute, fashionable things at an amazing price so it was money well spent.

Not only did I do activities but I also ate at some of my favorite places around Spain. Of course, I went and got gelato in Plaza Mayor and visited the local market there that is similar to the North Market here in Columbus. My friends and I also splurged one night and went to Jack Percoca a little Italian place we found with the best truffle mac and cheese I ever had! Throughout the trip I ate at the McDonald’s a couple times because I was either feeling homesick or I was craving it. The McDonald’s abroad is ten times better than the ones in America, plus they have a dessert cafe in each one.

On my last day of my internship, it was so hard to say goodbye. I made sure before the trip that I brought Ohio State thank you cards and pens for the people in my office. I wanted to make sure that before I left, I would be able to give them a proper thank you for having me, so I gave it to them at my farewell lunch. I also presented my marketing strategies for the company and finished translating the final documents from Spanish to English. Both of these projects were to get more people to donate and become ‘Friends of Aladina, as well as expand into the English market’. Not only did they like my ideas, but I also presented the entire thing in Spanish. I presented a powerpoint presentation, on the best ways to get more donations. I presented my ideas just like I would in class at Fisher. One minor difference was that they asked me questions while I presented instead of waiting till the end of the presentation. It was a great way for me to see that I improved my Spanish and I was able to help the organization who helped me!

 

International Experience: Non-profit v. For-profit

Summer Global Internship participant Alex Jackson discusses the differences between working abroad in Spain versus here in the United States, as she attends a meeting including the CEO of the company.

In working for a small nonprofit company, I was able to meet the founder and CEO of Fundación Aladina, Paco Arango. He is a very busy man, but would stop in the office every once in awhile for either a quick meeting or update. It was usually before the organization would have an event and the team would convene to talk logistics about the event. At first, it was hard for me to keep up during those meeting because everyone was speaking Spanish really fast. However, by the second mini meeting Paco had stopped and caught me up in English as to what was going on. Although I was able to understand most of the meeting, it was nice for him to make sure I understood. His reiterating the meeting in English affimed that I was improving on my Spanish speaking skills.

I was also able to sit in on their larger monthly meeting one afternoon. Surprisingly to me the meeting was through a working lunch. Through research, and the class we had taken before the trip, in Spain meetings do not usually happen over lunch because lunch is a social activity. Many times my entire office would go eat together for at least an hour and just take a break from the long day. I was also lucky to be able to get the food for the lunch with one of my co-workers Sara. This was a great way for me to learn more about her and get to know what she does at the organization. It was nice because she had only been there for about 4 months, so we were in the same boat when it came to adjusting to a new work environment.

The meeting was also located at Paco’s loft which had a long table in it specifically for business meeting. The topic of this meeting was, the new movie and its release across Spain. Fundación Aladina had been working hard on the movie premiere because all of the funds raised from the movie would go to the ‘Aladinos’, the children they assisted, so they could attend a summer camp specifically for kids with cancer. It was very interesting to see the differences and similarities of meetings in Spain versus the United States. Since the organization is so small, all employees except for Paco had a mini meeting beforehand to make sure they all knew how each of their roles would play into the premiere. When we got into the meeting Paco was doing most of the talking, my boss was constantly interrupted by him while she was explaining the plan. This was different than in the United States because usually the presentation would finish and then questions would be asked. Another interesting thing is that the movie release and premiere was a team effort but the discussion at the table was only between three major people, Paco, my boss, and a coordinator. I thought this was interesting because the rest of the team would not speak unless they were spoken to, or asked a question directly.

Also, the dress code of the meeting was very casual everyone was in jeans and a shirt either blouse of a t-shirt. In the United States people dress up in business professional clothes for meetings, but I did not know if this meeting was a special case because they are a non-profit. Paco also made all the final decisions. Seeing that he is a head of the company he took the information given to him and either told people to work on certain things or to change that part of the proposal completely. What I learned from the meeting is, like in the United States, always be prepared. I was not expecting to speak at the meeting but I did and was able to contribute to the conversation. It may be obvious but, do your best to follow the conversation. In the meeting people started talking at the same time and would interrupt each other, and I never knew if I could add to the meeting. Overall the meeting was casual, fun, and I was even able to speak a little on how the website marketing should work!

Volunteering in Spain

Interested in working with Non-Profits? Junior Alex Jackson talks about her experience volunteering with one in Madrid, Spain on the Summer Global Internship Program.

One of the great things about working with a non-profit organization is you can actually see the impact you have on the people you serve. Although I spend most of the time in the office I was able to visit Hospital Niño Jesus and volunteer with our ‘Aladinos’,who are children with cancer the Fundación Aladina supports. One of my coworkers let me go with her on her weekly visit to the hospital, just to spend time with the patients. I also visited the hospital midway through my time in Spain, this was a perfect way for me to see what the organization actually does and how what I work on daily would help the children.

When I arrived at the hospital, I was given a tour and able to see the wing of the hospital. There was a room full of toys, board games, and a TV for the students to be able to play with. At the end of the hall, there was a relaxation room for the parents of the patients. It had comfy chairs, TV’s, and its own bathroom. When I ask why it was created, it was for the parents to take a break from all the emotions that can come with a child in the hospital for so long. Also, each child’s room was designed for the patient to have the most comfortable experience while they are battling their cancer. It was also very colorful and the children’s artwork was on the walls in the halls and in each of their rooms.

While I was there we played charades, in Spanish. This was both fun and difficult for me because I had to really think about my vocabulary and make sure I even knew what they wrote down. One word I had to describes was ‘guitar’ and that was hard because I knew barely any vocabulary about music. One of the kids offered to help me! I would whisper the word describing a guitar in English to him and then he would whisper is back in Spanish. What made it more interesting was that the kids were speaking to me in English, but I was speaking with them in Spanish. This helped me with my Spanish and also helped to improve their English. When I would respond in English they would all say “OOOO NO ENGLISH” and then make me say it again in Spanish. The kids were having a blast and I could see my volunteering was good for the family too. The parents were able to relax, take a break, or have fun with the kids  while the volunteers were there. I was able to see that what Fundación Aladina does, really impacts the families lives with both the volunteering and the facilities they provide.

Also, since my visit was midway through my summer, it helped me to see why they had me doing the work I did. It reminded me of why I was there for the summer too. The work I was doing could bring in more funds for the organization, which meant the more children they were able to impact. My volunteering gave the kids a break from the doctors and let them be kids again for a little while. I started feeling a little homesick around this time because the “thrill” of living in a new place was wearing off and I was in a routine every day. The visit let me see that my work had purpose and even helped me create new ideas for my summer marketing project at the organization. I also started visiting new parts of Madrid I had not seen to remind myself that I was in Spain. This helped with my homesickness because it reminded me I would not be here forever and to enjoy every moment I had!

Getting the Job Done Right!

After a successful first weekend in Spain, Junior Alex Jackson talks about adjusting to working in an international environment as she participates in the Summer Global Internship Program. She shares her observation on the differences in business norms between Spain and the U.S.

Although my title is as a Marketing and Communications intern, they have me doing much more! It is nice though because some of my other friends on the trip are having trouble staying busy at work. My main function is to work on the website as well as my final marketing project on ways Fundacion Aladina can expand its image and into the community. Although it may not seem like a large task, working on the website and translating it from Spanish to English was helping the organization expand into English speaking markets, mainly the United States, because non-profit organizations are more common here. This is huge for them because a lot of their business runs on donations, so it is important for them to build relationships with as many people as possible.

Although I was mainly working on the website, I was able to see many different parts of the business. I was able to sit in on interviews to fill new positions, pack and ship merchandise to customers, and help plan a movie premier. It was really cool to see how a non-profit functioned and the multiple “hats” my colleagues would put on to accomplish their daily tasks.

Seeing these interactions in the office made me realize a couple of comparisons between business in the United States and in Spain. First, that time was not as important. Many times, meetings would not start on time and no one was offended. My coworkers would continue working until the meeting arrived and sometimes they would even continue working until they were ready to meet. In the United States time is very important, there is even the saying, “If you’re on time you’re late”. Another thing I noticed is that the organization was very friendly with their clients. They would all chat as though they have known each other for a long time and would greet each other with a hug. I do not know if this is because  I am at a nonprofit organization or if it is just how business is conducted in Spain. I also found it interesting that all of the meetings were in the morning before lunch. After I asked some of my co-workers, we came to the conclusion that after lunch people may have other obligations such as family, health, or social. The work life balance in Spain is very important and I even noticed this with my boss when I was sick she told me to take the day off and get checked out. It seemed as though the person came first and the work came second.

These differences in the workplace were refreshing to see, because in the United States it seems like the job comes first and then the person. Or that we are very business oriented and worried about time that we do not get to know those we do business with or the best thing for the employees. The friendly and truly team-oriented culture, made me want to do my job even better because I know my work truly mattered. I also realized that jobs are not always about the money, but you have to fit well with the people and overall culture of the company. When looking for an internship for next summer, I will definitely make sure the company has good values and company culture.  Although I think this idea is changing in U.S. business culture it was heavily a part of the business culture in Spain.

Summer in Spain? Don’t mind if I do!

Summer Global Internship Program Participant, Alex Jackson, talks about her anticipation of working abroad in Madrid, Spain! She also shares some insights to the process of being matched up with companies.

I was just accepted to go to Spain for the Summer Global Internship Program! I am excited to learn about the culture in Spain as well as improve my Spanish speaking skills. That is the main reason why I decided to study in Spain, because I think it is important to know another language. I have been taking Spanish since I was a freshman in high school, but do not get to use it much at school. I am hoping through this experience I will be able to come back speaking more smoothly than I do now!

The job hunt process for the program was fast and easy. The partnering agency was personable and really wanted to make sure I was placed in an internship I felt I would enjoy! The first interview was with the partnering agency getting to know me, going over my resume, testing my Spanish, and figuring out what I wanted in a company. Be honest during the interview, because you are interviewing for what you want to get out of the internship. Also, know your resume, they will ask you questions about it! Because of my previous history with speaking Spanish, I was able to be placed at a company that only spoke Spanish! This was exciting for me because I knew I would be fully immersed in the language and Spanish culture. My preferences for a company were a little difficult because I wanted to work for a small nonprofit organization, because I wanted to see the differences between working at a for profit company and a nonprofit. Although they said it might be a difficult hunt, they were able to find an organization for me! The search for an organization took about three months, I actually forgot I was going to be working in Spain for a little bit! However, the wait did not disappoint!

The partnering agency was able to find two non-profit organizations who were willing to have an intern for the Summer! After weighing my options I decided to go with Fundación Aladina, a nonprofit that supports children with cancer. When I decided on my organization, I took to the social media to find out more about them. They were VERY active on social media and their Instagram was beautiful! I could tell by their interaction with the followers and office pictures they posted that their organization was like a family. I then had a follow-up interview with Ishtar Espejo, who is the director of the organization and fortunately we hit it off! She enjoyed my energy, was informative, excited to work with me, and was very clear of her expectations of the internship. The interview with my boss made me even more excited to go! She expressed that she wanted my internship to be a learning experience for both of us. This reassured me that I was going to have a great experience because the organization wanted me there as much as I wanted to be there!

All while I was waiting to hear back from the partnering agency, all the students going to Spain were taking a class on Spain and what to expect. This was very helpful because the campus coordinator for the partnering agency came to a couple sessions and we were able to ask her so many questions! The most informative class for me, was when students from the previous summer came to speak to us. They were able to give us tips, such as, do not leave your phone on the table when you eat and good places to visit in the city. In the class a lot of students seemed nervous to be traveling so far for so long, however I was so excited! Traveling has always been a passion of mine and being able to travel and gain more experience in my major was a win win!

Networking…. Globally!

Network, network, network… Katelyn Mistele has heard this at OSU, but felt the need and benefits of networking abroad even more as she was on the Student Exchange Program in Denmark! Read her advise on what she did and wished she have done while abroad on networking with peers and professionals.

“Today it’s all about who you know not what you know.”

“Network, network, network.”

We hear it all the time, and I’ve even experienced it but networking is an essential and integral part of today’s business environment.  I personally have experienced the impacts of networking, and challenged myself when I was abroad to network on a global scale. During my time in Denmark I was able to begin to create my network of global individuals, but there is still a lot of room to grow. In this post I talk about networking on a global scale, and tips for things I didn’t do during my time in Denmark, but wish I did.

Networking with Peers

When studying at a large business university, networking happens naturally. If you get 500 plus exchange students at a university that is 20,000 plus students from all over the world there to solely study business networking occurs naturally. A lot of times I found myself sharing stories about my previous internships with other students and they would do the same. At the end of the day I left Denmark with a lot of new LinkedIn connections, and a new network of individuals who I could potentially connect with again in the future.

I personally have found a lot of my job opportunities through networking. I always ask individuals what they do for a living and share my aspirations and experiences with them at the end of the conversation too. I have found that people love talking about their careers and/or goals, and if you act curious it could result in a connection that could benefit you in the future. This is what I did with a lot of my peers abroad. While the relationships might not benefit me right now in the future, if I decide to make a career change I now have a large network of individuals from all over the world who could possibly assist in this.

A photo of some of my abroad peers.  Students from Michigan, Boston, South Carolina, and Canada!

 

Networking with Professors/Professionals

I wish I would have taken my networking skills to the next level and connected with my professors at my university. At the time I didn’t have aspirations to work abroad but now when I am searching out a full time career this is something that is on my radar that wasn’t before. A lot of the professors at Copenhagen Business School were from all over the world and were expatriates too, so they would have been able to help me navigate if a global career is for me and how to navigate the legalities of making this reality. I suggest to anyone studying abroad to connect with your professors! They could be a powerful resource in the future.

Social Benefits of Networking

Apart from networking from a career standpoint there is a lot of benefits of socially networking as well. I was able to connect with people from all over the world even prior to leaving for Denmark. I also make an effort to get individuals contact information who I meet. I was able to leverage these individuals I met for not only suggestions and recommendations, but potentially to stay with them if I travel to their home country. Prior to leaving for Denmark I met exchange students at Ohio State from the Netherlands and Italy and while I didn’t end up connecting with them in person while I was in Europe, they were able to provide me with travel suggestions and tips for when I visited their country. At the end of the day culture sharing is so important and a part of daily life in Europe, so these individuals want to connect with you (I wrote a post on culture sharing earlier feel free to look for it if you’re interested!). One of my connections I met from the Netherlands even invited me to her home to dine with her family. While I didn’t end up being able to take advantage of this opportunity, it was a powerful feeling knowing that I had made a connection that was this ingrained. All of these connections I made was simply by being curious!

If studying abroad or even just traveling I urge you to network, network, network! Whether socially or professionally, both of these types of relationships can help you in the future. Even if it’s not on your radar yet! So go network abroad and at home!!

A photo from students from schools in Wisconsin and Minnesota!

My Experiences in a Global Work Environment

Katelyn Mistele shares her experience working for a global company and how being culturally aware led to her success in her job. From working in a diverse team to working across borders, she says that being open-minded and receptive to different communication styles is critical to gain the respect of co-workers, to build your credibility, and to become a desired team member within the company!

With globalization impacting nearly ever industry and a lot of the companies that operate in a global environment it is inevitable that at one point in your career you will be a part of a global team or a team that does business with individuals from all across the globe. I have been fortunate enough to have had professional experience working both with global teams and on a global team myself and the communication style and dynamic is truly different and extremely important in facilitating project success.

The past two summers I worked at Rockwell Automation which is a large multinational corporation headquartered out of Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Rockwell operates in the industrial automation industry producing equipment and software that is used to automate manufacturing lines. Two summers ago I worked on a culturally diverse team within the inside sales department, and this past summer I worked in the logistics department and had a boss from Europe and high levels of interaction with logistics teams all across the world. Both of these experiences have taught me a great deal of how to work and communicate effectively with global teams.

My first summer with Rockwell placed me on a culturally diverse team. My boss was Indian by heritage raised in a household by immigrant parents. I had a team member from Russia, and also a team member who was raised in a traditional Mexican environment as his parents were immigrants as well. This added to a lot of diverse cultures, all operating towards the common goal of the team. I had high degrees of interaction with my boss and my coworker from Russia and I learned a lot about interacting with individuals from other cultures.

For starters the conversations with my boss were a lot more of a teaching style than what I have encountered in the past. My boss never was extremely direct in saying yes or no. After doing some research on the Indian’s communication culture the word “no” is considered very direct and hostile. Instead in the Indian culture individuals tend to have open discussions with each other and respect and place value in opinions that might oppose their own. I truly did see this when reflecting on my experience at Rockwell. My boss, even though I was completely new to the team and industry, always valued my ideas and wanted our dialog to be open in nature.

On the other hand, I experienced a dramatically different communication style with my team member from Russia. She was extremely direct and to the point and wouldn’t waver in telling me if a process I was using was wrong. This was helpful as she was training me on the customer relationship management platform, so we were able to accomplish a lot in a short period of time, but it did take some adjusting to the “directness” of her communication style. This summer my experience was great in exposing me to these differences that exist within teams and how they communicate. It was great exposure that allowed me to be successful in my second internship with Rockwell.

My second summer allowed me to have high degrees of interactions with teams from all over the world. Specifically, I had to contact teams in Brazil, Netherlands, and China and for each of these teams I approached these conversations very differently. I used the awareness I developed in my previous summer in order to be successful.

The very high level project I was working on required me to reach out to teams spanning the global and get data from them from their logistics departments. I knew that I had to be cognizant of the cultures I was dealing with due to my prior experiences with globally diverse teams. When approaching individuals in Europe I would explain high level why I needed the data because otherwise I found it common that they would ask why before providing what was needed. It was important to explain yourself whereas in the United States my team members would never explain themselves they would just expect it to get done. For the teams in the Asia Pacific region I had to reach out to it was important for me to be extremely clear in what metrics I needed since I found out quickly they had a different way of collecting data in their region. For example in the United States we were using $/lb, Europe was $/kg, and China had a metric cpk which was their own way of collecting data that they had to interpret for me. Finally, for those team members in Latin America I had to be more friendly and open to their family experiences. For example, one individual I was working with had to leave work at 2:00pm every day for her children and so our meetings had to be prior to this time. The Latin American working culture and family culture are much more intertwined in Brazil as opposed to the United States, so I had to be aware of this.

Additionally, another thing I had to take into consideration was the time difference. We communicated a lot via email, but these conversations would span over a few days when if they had taken place within the US the conversations would have lasted a  day or two. Additionally, I had to have calls with those in Europe at 8am my time, so they could call in before leaving the office for the day.

The main take away from this post and my experience is to be open-minded and receptive to communication styles. They truly do differ from country to country, and it doesn’t take much time on our end to adjust our style and be adaptable to others we are working with. At the end of the day by showing effort of doing this will gain the respect of those you are working with. Also, it not only facilitates project success, but also builds up your credibility and desirability as a working employee of a global workforce. I personally love working in diverse environments because it is challenging and I always learn a lot not only about other cultures but also about myself, so I am hoping that I will be able to continue this in my future career.

Below are some photos from my time in Europe on Fisher’s Student Exchange Program, since I know this post was text heavy. I have the cultural differences I realized regarding communication in my captions to further emphasize just how difference this piece is in difference regions of the world!

Photo from London, England. While we often think London is super similar to the United States it’s interesting to see small every day words having different meanings. The most obvious is “chips” meaning french fries in England as opposed to actual french fries like we think in the United States. In addition a “lift” is an elevator in Britain.
A photo from Burano, Italy which is off the coast of Venice, Italy. The Italian culture is very family oriented. I often found myself in family owned restaurants and stores, and being greeted in a warm fashion. Additionally, Italians are very passionate and boisterous and this leads to a different type of communication style.

 

Denmark, and Scandinavian cultures, had a very different culture when it came to communication than what we experience here in the United States. For starters from an outsiders perspective they come off very cold, but at the end of the day the Danes just value close relationships and it is tough to gain that level of trust with them. I would often find myself at the grocery store asking the clerk how they were and they would laugh in response. I finally asked someone and they said it was because they viewed my question as impersonal as I am not within their close knit circle of friends and family.

Coming Back from Australia

Maggie Hobson counts the many blessing from the semester abroad as she returns to the U.S. from Australia, after completing her semester at Curtin University on the Student Exchange Program.

My last day in Australia:

8-10am: Enjoyed my final $10 black coffee and raspberry muffin at my favorite on-campus cafe as I did some last minute studying

10-11:10am: Psychology exam

11:10am-2pm: Made my last meal of pasta using the one pan, one bowl and one fork that I bought for the entire semester and ate it while doing more last minute studying

2-4:10pm: Human Structure and Function exam

4:10-6pm: Packed my things, cleaned my room and had it inspected by the RA

6-9:30pm: Said my goodbyes with the amazing friends I made during the semester over one final group dinner

A few of my friends outside the car, saying goodbye

9:30-11:55pm: Went to the airport and checked in

From that time on, I traveled 32 hours to be greeted by my parents in the Chicago airport where my audit internship with EY started the next morning.

My parents greeting me at the airport with a sign

To some, this may seem like a “day” (it was only a day since I gained 12 hours) they would dread, but to me this is a day to be so thankful for.  First of all, I had the opportunity to study in Australia and take classes a regular accounting major at OSU would not normally take.  Not to mention, my professors were able to move my exams early so that I could get back to Chicago in time for my internship.  Secondly, I made amazing friendships and lasting memories that I will never forget.  Thirdly, I was greeted by two very supportive parents who were able to meet me away from home (Ohio) in order to move my things into an apartment in Chicago for the summer.  Lastly, I am humbled to start an internship with EY where I am able to gain experience working for a big four accounting firm.

OSU has provided me with so many great opportunities and for that I am forever thankful.  Studying abroad in Australia has been hands down my favorite college experience and I would do nothing to change my experience there.  I am satisfied with the time I spent there: the places I was able to explore, the people I met and the things I was able to accomplish.  Now, I am looking forward to continuing my internship with EY.  My fellow interns have already been so enthralled by the fact that I was living in Australia for five months.  I plan to share my experiences in a beneficial way.  The knowledge I learned about different cultures through becoming friends with so many exchange students from all around the world, will only benefit me in the workplace.  Therefore, overall I am thankful for this experience because it did not only influence me personally, but professionally as well.

 

Networking at Rikkyo and Job Hunting

Through one of his classes at Rikkyo University, Cayhil Grubbs had the opportunity to visit Adidas Japan! Hear about his experience interacting with business people in Japan on the Student Exchange Program.

My interactions with Japanese business professionals were fairly limited in number, but significant, especially in a class I took called Business Project. In this class, Adidas Japan came in and presented us with a marketing related problem that they are currently facing. We were tasked with finding the best way to measure Net Promoter Score (NPS), and where we could measure it best. We formed groups to solve this problem, and in mid-October and early December we went to Adidas Japan’s headquarters to present our research and solutions.

During my two visits to Adidas Japan’s HQ, I had several opportunities to network with current employees and Rikkyo alumni at Adidas. The employees were more than willing to talk about what it’s like to work in Japan and their experiences with Adidas Japan. I also met several senior executives and mid-level managers that were happy to talk about their career paths, and what they liked or disliked about working in Japan.

I learned a lot about searching for jobs from Japanese students. Looking for a job at a Japanese company in Japan is very different from the United States. Internships differ between the two countries as they usually last one or two days in Japan versus two or three months in the United States. These one day internships are unpaid. Students do most of their network through these internships and career fairs. In Japan, looking for a job once you graduate is called “Job Hunting” as they typically take time off of school to schedule a lot of interviews, do as many one day internships as possible, and go to a lot of career fairs. Japanese workers rarely change companies. As far as networking goes, reach out to your professors and counselors to find out about career fairs and potential job opportunities. Several of the professors at Rikkyo teach part-time and work at various firms. Most networking techniques that work in the U.S. also work in Japan, so put them to use and be persistent.