Learning Cultural Intelligence (CQ) – Core vs. Flex

“‘Everyone assumes that Cultural Intelligence (CQ) comes from understanding other people’s cultures, but you really have to understand your own’ (Middleton). Julia is so right about this point.” says Sydney Lapin studying abroad on the Student Exchange Program at Ecole de Management Strasbourg in Strasbourg, France. Read more on what she learned about CQ and how it related to her experience abroad, as well as how being abroad has helped her learn about her own culture and about herself.

Friends from all over Europe getting together for Valentine’s Day

The other day in my International Marketing Strategy class, we watched a Ted Talk that really spoke out to me. It was called “Cultural Intelligence: The Competitive Edge for Leaders” spoken by Julia Middleton. In the beginning, Julia defines cultural intelligence as “the ability to cross borders and boundaries between different cultures,  and actually thrive in doing so and love doing it and never want to not do it”. Julia grew up in the time where IQ meant everything, where it was considered crucial. Then, EQ (Emotional Intelligence) came around and people realized that it would be good for leaders to have this trait as well. However, people who are “good with people”, may really just be good with people who are like them. That is where CQ (Cultural Intelligence) comes into play: “the ability to work with people, and lead people, who are not like you”.

Julia went around the world, studying and interviewing people who she thought to have a good amount of cultural intelligence. Through her conversations, she found one large thing in common: “They had sort of figured out which bits of them was core, and which bits of them was flex”. By core “bits”, Julia means the behaviors, values and beliefs that are absolutely crucial to you being who you are, and a part of you that you are not willing to change. By flex bits, Julia means everything else that you are willing to compromise, or be flexible about. She states, “The more core you are, the more people trust you. The more flex you are, the more people trust you”. By this I believe she means that one needs to find a good balance, and that balance is what people who obtain cultural intelligence have found. For example, a salesperson is extremely flexible, and you lose all parts of your core and no one trusts you. And then, as Julia mentions, you have people like your grandparents, who are so set in their core that they refuse to be the least bit flexible.

Julia stated that cultural intelligence is found on the line between one’s core and one’s flex, and it moves from learning new things, gaining new experiences, and meeting new people. This video really got me thinking about which parts of me are core, and which parts are flex. I thought about my life, and my culture, and I tried and am still trying to figure it out. I think it will take a long time, if not forever, for someone to truly figure out where they stand because like Julia says, the line is always moving based on the things you learn and the people you meet.

Being abroad, I completely see how this video connects with my life. I have met people from all over the world, and not only met them but have held conversations, been involved in group projects, and traveled with these people of different backgrounds. There are parts of me I have and still need to adapt in order to get things to go smoothly when I work with people from other cultures.

With that, I am talking about the part of the video where Julia mentions knots in the core. We all have knots: parts of our supposed core that are based on PRE-judgement, rather than judgement. These are things we should push at and work on changing about ourselves. They might not be pretty, but I feel like that’s the point. For example, something I know I need to work on is my emotional resilience. When coming abroad, I thought that I had a pretty good grip on the things that would be difficult: the language barrier, the bureaucracy, the new school system. However, I did not think about preparing myself for how to react when difficult things are occurring. This is emotional resilience, the ability to bounce back and be okay when something is extremely frustrating and difficult. I have bounced back, but there are situations that I know I could have been more flexible and less reactive about.

An important part of the Ted Talk was where CQ comes from: “Everyone assumes that CQ comes from understanding other people’s cultures, but you really have to understand your own” (Middleton). Julia is so right about this point. She talks about the need to understand how your culture helps you versus hinders you, how it could open doors or close them, when your culture causes other people problems, and when your culture causes you to miss opportunities. To quote myself from my application, I thought one of the most important things was for me to “experience new cultures, learn about different backgrounds, and immerse myself in these cultures”. However, I now realize that the most important thing I am doing here, aside from learning about other cultures (which of course is still important), is learning who I am and how my culture, my core and my flex, affect my life and the people around me.

It is actually extremely complex, because when I think about the many things that I thought I was flexible on, it turns out that in some situations here I have found these things as “knots” in my core: they are things I want and aim to be flexible about, but I am currently not there yet, like my emotional resilience for example. It also turns out that when thinking deeper, things that I thought were in my core are actually things that I am quite flexible on. The biggest example of that I can think of is my Judaism. Being Jewish has always been one of the most important parts of me. I grew up in Cleveland, in an amazing Jewish community, that gave me so many opportunities I am grateful for. While being Jewish is something I hold very close, this video has made me think about the fact that yes, I am Jewish. Yes, this is important to me, and a part of me that I will not change. But, Judaism is actually one of the most flexible religions in the world. For instance, I personally do not think I believe in God, or in a lot of the things that supposedly happened back then, but Judaism still accepts me as a Jew. I am flexible to new opinions that go along with Judaism, and my thoughts and beliefs about it are always changing. So while being Jewish is something in my core, something that makes me who I am, I am still quite flexible about my beliefs through my religion.

I am beyond grateful to have seen this video while being abroad, and to be able to relate it to my everyday life here in Strasbourg, France. I feel as though I am much more aware of my personal strengths and weaknesses, and what I need to work on in order to become more culturally aware and to gain cultural intelligence. I know that the journey to having cultural intelligence is not easy, and will take a long time, but I think it is so important to be open to changing things about yourself, while also realizing what you are not willing to change in order to be who you are.

A trip to the Black Forest in Germany

Building Your Global Career

Having aspiration of working abroad one day, Katelyn Mistele attends a professional speaker event at Copenhagen Business School (Denmark) about setting yourself up for a global career. She learns about the pros and cons of having a globally mobile career, and shares her insights on her experience studying abroad and what she gained from being abroad.

Copenhagen Business School is like Fisher in the fact that many companies and speakers frequently visit the school to give talks and recruit. There was an individual who is currently work with Maersk, the largest shipping company in the world, but also worked with P&G with Gillette, who put on a presentation one day. I decided to attend as the message of the talk was marketing yourself and setting yourself up for a global career. 

The individual who was giving the talk has led a successful and extensive global career. He is from London but after working with P&G for a few years in London he made a jump to Switzerland. From that he changed companies and spent the next decade jumping between Singapore and London with Maersk. Today he sits in Denmark still working with Maersk and his career is still mobile and he will most likely make another career move soon. This background was so interesting to me because I have always heard about individuals being globally mobile with their career but this isn’t as common in the United States. Instead, we see intercontinental movement with jobs. The speaker proposed that the major contributing factor to his ability to be mobile in Europe is the European Union and how it is easier to be mobile for work here than it is across boarders in other parts of the world. 

He asked us to brain storm a list of questions regarding what we would ask if we were asked by a company to confirm that we are globally mobile. As a class we came up with questions regarding the length of the assignment, the preparation in cultural terms before the project, questions regarding the location itself, and the opportunities for development during the assignment and after the assignment. There are a lot of deciding factors that go into deciding if an individual wants a global career and its important to keep in mind aspects regarding preparation and development. In terms of preparation the speaker told us that small moves as opposed to big ones have more problems. For example a jump from England to France is harder to adjust to than a jump from England to Singapore. Another key factor to take into consideration is the development opportunities during the assignment and after the assignment. A lot of times with expatriation assignments there is high failure rates upon arrival back to ones home country as readjusting seems to be harder. The speaker told us that during his return from one of his projects his mentor told him to not talk about his experiences that much because people back at home really don’t care that much. He said it was so hard to keep his thoughts and experiences completely to himself but he said in the long run it was worth it and helped him to get back into to the English culture faster. 

This presentation was very interesting for me as working abroad or on abroad accounts is something I am definitely interested in looking into in the future. At a first glance I, as I am sure most other people would be, just think about the location. We all want to travel and work somewhere cool, but there are many important factors that contribute to what would make this a successful assignment and contribute to a successful global career. The speaker also suggested that if we have any inkling to go and lead a global career that we should. He said that the 70-20-10 model can be applied to working on international assignments as 70% of your learning in your career happens on the job and the best way to learn and grow in an international environment is to just take the job. The 20% is learning what happens with peers or mentors and the 10% is “classroom learning” which can happen in the class room or even on the internet in the form of training videos. All parts of this model apply to any assignment but the speaker was trying to point out that you learn the most from being on the job so if you want to grow your career internationally it makes the most sense to take international opportunities as they arise because that’s when you’ll learn and grow the most. 

He also mentioned how the environment of global employment is changing. There are now an increase in short term assignments which last less than two years and this is a positive as it is making people more mobile. However, there is a downside as customers do not like when people continuously rotate as it is harder to build long term relationships. Also companies are starting to now really look at the cost of expatriation as it is very expensive. So the question that is facing employees and businesses today is what is the balance? 

Personally, I hope that at some point in my career I have the opportunity to go on an expatriation assignment. After spending some time in Denmark, I have grown so much culturally and learned a lot. Only these international experiences can provide you with this personal growth. It is one thing to just read about a culture and learn about its nuances but you really do not reap all the benefits of cultural exposure and integration unless you go and live in the culture. I personally have become not only more mindful of my nature, but also have picked up some of the Danish cultural traits. For example, Jantelov is an integral part of Danish culture. At its core, Jantelov is the idea that everyone is equal and on the same level and the Danish peoples actions should be in accordance with this idea. It goes further to describe how if one fall the society will catch them and help them back up. After being here and living in this culture I definitely can see aspects of this part of their culture and I am hoping that I will be able to assimilate parts of it into my everyday life and bring this part of Danish culture with me back to my life in the United States. 

I strongly believe that cultural integration and sharing is something that I think will not only benefit myself and my career but could benefit a lot of individuals. As the speaker suggested 70% of learning happens on the job, and I think this can extend to study abroad or any cultural experience. It is important for myself to take advantage of these opportunities, and I hope that someday I will have the chance to go on an international assignment and further learn and mold my own cultural identity. 

Networking While Abroad

“I would highly recommend reaching out to business professionals wherever you go abroad.” says Megan Reardon who attended Singapore Management University. She gives tips and advice on how you can set up informational interviews with professionals abroad to take full advantage of expanding your network while abroad!

One of the top reasons that I chose to go to Singapore is because I am really interested in working abroad once I graduate. That being said, I was excited to start grabbing coffee with Singaporean business professionals. It was surprisingly easy to find people to meet with once in Singapore. There are four different ways I was able to connect with people:

1. LinkedIn. I was able to search my LinkedIn connections for graduates of Ohio State who lived in Singapore. I reached out to several people this way and was able to meet for coffee with a few people in the banking industry and the fashion industry. More so – they were all impressed that I took initiative to reach out that they were able to give good recommendations for places to search for internships and jobs in Singapore. One of my connections brought me out to eat with his whole family, so they would understand what native English sounds like!

2. Leveraging professors. Before I went to Singapore, I spoke with my professors at Ohio State about my goals. Several professors were able to connect me with their peers in Singapore, which shows the power of connections given how small Singapore is. As it turns out, one of my professors at Singapore Management University (SMU) received their PhD in Finance at Ohio State! It was interesting to be able to talk to him about the differences between Ohio State and SMU.

3. Past work experience. I knew that one of my past internships in Cleveland had a location in Singapore that operated their Asian business. Since I knew that I was going to Singapore when I interned with this company, I was able to talk with the people who did business in Singapore before I went abroad then meet them in person while in Singapore.

4. Family connections. Though I previously believed that my family had no connections in Singapore, I asked my dad to reach out to one of his work friends that lived there previously. They set me up with someone else, and before I knew it, I was talking to my cousin’s best friend’s older brother who happened to go to the same college as my dad and had a cousin that I was friends with at Ohio State. What a small world!

It was typically very informal when I met with the business people. I would usually ask that they pick the place where we would meet – this gave the professionals flexibility and gave me good recommendations regarding the “local favorites.” We would usually meet at a coffee shop, and the conversation would start pretty naturally given that we had already exchanged a few emails by that point. Some of my favorite conversation topics were:

1. Do you see significant growth opportunities in Singapore in regards to business as a whole?

2. Do you do any business with the U.S., and if so, what are the major differences that you see?

3. I would usually ask about their family, whether it be a simple, “Do you live with your family here?” or “How are your kids liking school here(primary school in Singapore is much different than in the U.S.)?”

4. Would you recommend working in Singapore?

I would highly recommend reaching out to business professionals wherever you go abroad. This gives you the chance to experience other cultures at a more personal level and determine more about the working culture to decide whether or not you want to work abroad.

Business Etiquette in Asian Countries

Megan Reardon, studying at Singapore Management University for a semester, talks about what she has learned on how to conduct business in Asia.

While Singapore is a very Westernized culture compared to other Asian countries, business is still built on the same founding principles as other Asian countries. Most of the principles here are applicable in the workplace, but also in the school environment. In general, business in Asia is more focused on the group rather than the individual. This stems from the familial ties in Asia. Business emphasizes family and kinship more than the individual, as in the U.S. To be successful in Asia, the first thing is to ensure that you are willing to put in the long hours to get to know the people you are working with. In Asia, it isn’t about just signing a contract. It’s only when your Asian business colleague is fully willing to trust you that you will make any progress.

“Face” is an important concept in Asia. “Face” is essentially preventing embarrassment at all costs. You can lose face, save face, and give face. You should avoid putting possible partners in situations where they are required to contradict their superiors, give black and white answers, or make them uncomfortable in any way. This is typically regarded as not only disrespectful, but will cause the partner to lose face and thus lose trust in your partnership. It is very much appreciated when you give face to another person. Giving meaningful gifts, complimenting them to their superiors, or other positive affirmations give face to another person.

Another important business etiquette is the importance of exchanging business cards. You should have your information printed in English on one side and your language printed in the local language on the other side. Have plenty of business cards, as they are exchanged frequently. When you first meet someone, it is normal to give them a business card, even if you never anticipate doing business with them. When exchanging business cards, you should hold the card with both hands and present it to your counterpart.

A final business etiquette is becoming fluent in popular phrases of the country you are visiting. While most business in Asia is conducted in English, it is important to recognize that English is never their first language, and phrases in their native language could go a long way. Essential phrases like hello, good to meet you, and thank you could make the difference between a business deal gone right or wrong.
In Singapore, business people are accustomed to Western business practices. Almost everyone speaks fluent English and is comfortable enough with Western practices. That being said, first impressions are important and being prepared and comfortable with standard Asian business practices will show strong interest in conducting business in Singapore.

Networking at Rikkyo and Job Hunting

Through one of his classes at Rikkyo University, Cayhil Grubbs had the opportunity to visit Adidas Japan! Hear about his experience interacting with business people in Japan on the Student Exchange Program.

My interactions with Japanese business professionals were fairly limited in number, but significant, especially in a class I took called Business Project. In this class, Adidas Japan came in and presented us with a marketing related problem that they are currently facing. We were tasked with finding the best way to measure Net Promoter Score (NPS), and where we could measure it best. We formed groups to solve this problem, and in mid-October and early December we went to Adidas Japan’s headquarters to present our research and solutions.

During my two visits to Adidas Japan’s HQ, I had several opportunities to network with current employees and Rikkyo alumni at Adidas. The employees were more than willing to talk about what it’s like to work in Japan and their experiences with Adidas Japan. I also met several senior executives and mid-level managers that were happy to talk about their career paths, and what they liked or disliked about working in Japan.

I learned a lot about searching for jobs from Japanese students. Looking for a job at a Japanese company in Japan is very different from the United States. Internships differ between the two countries as they usually last one or two days in Japan versus two or three months in the United States. These one day internships are unpaid. Students do most of their network through these internships and career fairs. In Japan, looking for a job once you graduate is called “Job Hunting” as they typically take time off of school to schedule a lot of interviews, do as many one day internships as possible, and go to a lot of career fairs. Japanese workers rarely change companies. As far as networking goes, reach out to your professors and counselors to find out about career fairs and potential job opportunities. Several of the professors at Rikkyo teach part-time and work at various firms. Most networking techniques that work in the U.S. also work in Japan, so put them to use and be persistent.

Professional Interactions in Vienna

In travels to Vienna, Austria during the fall of 2017 on the Student Exchange Program, senior Peyton Bykowski discovers the importance of understanding business etiquette and professional interactions on a global scale.

The United States has very strict and regulated guidelines on how we conduct business and how businessmen and women interact on a professional level. Austria, based on research and experience, has similar, preset guidelines and standards that are to be met. If anything, there are firmer guidelines in how a student interacts with his or her lecturer, how to act and dress in business situations, and how Vienna itself provides resources for its students to find jobs and careers.

In the classroom at WU (Wirtschaftuniversitat – Vienna University of Economics and Business), it is fairly informal, surprisingly, in terms of business conduct at a business school. During presentations it is not required to dress business formal or business casual as it is at Ohio State. Presentations occur weekly for many classes, so having to consistently dress business professionally can be tedious, so it is not required or even asked of the students to dress up. However, there is more respect in terms of the student-teacher relationship. Students address the lecturer as “Professor” unless told otherwise. At the end of the class, the students knock on the table as a respectful notion to the Professor to thank him/her for teaching them today.

Many students also use the professors as a networking opportunity. As this is a small university, the students often have the same Professors multiple times for different classes. And since the classes are never larger than about 40 people, they tend to get to know them well. Similarly to Ohio State and the U.S., Professors allow insight for students on the business world and potential opportunities or careers to pursue. Many students often keep in contact with their university professors as a means of networking as well.

In terms of career events, Vienna has several for the city, but rarely are they specific to WU students. WU does have an online career and job portal similar to Fisher’s, but for large career fairs Vienna has two main events: Meet Your Job, which requires 1 application submitted to a student who is then matched with different company’s for short interviews at the fair, and Career Calling, which is a large company expo similar to the Fall and Spring Career Fairs at Ohio State. However, these fairs and events are much more relied on in Vienna than they are at Ohio State. Many students need them in order to find their work experience, as connections in the business world are not as utilized in Vienna. In the U.S. it is an unspoken rule that business students need internship experience before graduation, and then need professional work experience before attending grad school. In Austria, and most of Europe, it is not as necessary for students to have undergraduate work experience as they transition directly to grad school post university graduation. This was an interesting difference, as I can see value to both courses of education.

In regards to business etiquette and interactions in Vienna, there are not many differences than the U.S. I think the largest difference is in regard to the blunt nature of Austrians. Professors tend to interrupt during student presentations to offer feedback and thoughts; whereas in the U.S. and at Ohio State, it is more typical for a professor to hear the presentation through before offering feedback. Similarly to the U.S. though, Austrians greatly value punctuality and seriousness. This then relates to the importance of first impressions. First impressions weigh heavily on Austrians and so it is important to know the proper professional interactions before meeting with the individual(s). This would include the proper dress codes, not only for professional interactions but for dinners, the dress codes of certain facilities (i.e. Opera), etc. Overall, Austrians are conservative in terms of business etiquette and in nature when received by others.

Researching and experiencing different business etiquette practices has been really important to my understanding of global business. Understanding different practices and actually practicing them are completely different. I have always known how important it is to do your homework on the people, company, and culture of individuals I am meeting with, whether it be for a collaborative assignment, job interview, etc. However, remembering my homework on Vienna’s professional etiquette has helped me to understand what it is actually like while here. WU offers a lot of incredible resources to aid its students from all over the globe further their careers. Whether that’s the EBN group or Career Fairs for Viennese students, WU students are extremely successful and help new students to a new country learn quickly.

WU Career Fair Exhibit

Go, Experience, Live Abroad!

A message from Anastasia Cook to future student who are considering a semester abroad on the Student Exchange Program: Go, Experience, Live! She shares her heart filling memories and the reasons why you should go abroad to Università Commerciale Luigi Bocconi in Italy.

GO. If you are considering it, but not sure if you will feel home sick, if you will make friends, you won’t like the location, or whatever reason: YOU WILL BE FINE! Exchange was seriously the BEST 5 months of my entire life. I never wanted it to end. No, this is not because I choose a blow off course load, and just partied the whole time. I went to “the Harvard of Europe” AKA Bocconi, a program only available through Fisher. This was so much better than a regular program because it was useful classes, and the professors are world recognized lecturers whom have a deep passion for their subject.

I decided to take Corporate Finance, even though it is a known “difficult” class even for full time Bocconi Students. After about a week, I found myself reading the Wall Street Journal and Financial Times in my free time, not only because it helped me during our open discussions in class, but also because I was shocked that I could actually fully understand what the articles were saying. Not only this, but we were given two case studies throughout the semester that were from Harvard and Stanford. These studies also brought real life situations into the classroom, thus showing us the applicability of finance in everyday business life. Some classes were harder than others, but now this is a school I am going to apply to, for my MBA; pretty cool.

Besides the school, THE PEOPLE. All I can say is: my best friends are Swedish, Norwegian, German, and Italian after this short time period. I have already booked a flight back to Europe during the summer to visit my friends that I have made. When you combine many people from all over the world, its not a lonely feeling. People are so keen on meeting as many people as they can, and genuinely want to get to know you. We started out attending international student events that Italian students held, to throwing our own events that the Italians then came to. It was so cool to see how you find your “group”. Trust me, you will never be alone.

I have to mention the Erasmus student group here, because they truly got me out of my shell. I went to speed dating, social nights, and weekend trips to Tuscany with this group. From this, I ended up planning a 2 week long spring break in the South of Italy with some of the people I had meet through this group. My favorite memory that I had from one of my trips was going to Morocco, four wheeling in the Sahara Desert and then spending the night at a desert camp.

If you couldn’t tell already, I studied in Italy. Milan to be exact. Many people at first were shocked that this was not “so quaint” and filled with cobble stone streets, but it was SO MUCH MORE. One of the least touristy cities in Italy, thus filled with actual Italian culture, and hidden secrets that one would only know of if they actually went to school there. I HIGHLY recommend this city and this program. I took friends from home around to some of my new favorite places and although it was not the Colosseum, I swear they liked it way better than the tourist traps.

I am tearing up writing this, because I would give anything in the world to go back even just for one more week. GO, EXPERIENCE, LIVE!!! It goes by so fast, so really try to soak up every single moment…. You’ll never get a chance like this again.

Intro to Ireland – Brexit

As Grainne Hutchinson studies in Ireland on the Student Exchange Program, she enjoys her involvement with the University Philological Society. From seeing the first minister of Scotland, Nicola Sturgeon, and talking about Brexit and the affect on Ireland, she shares her experience of the wonderful events held at Trinity College.

I know I have mentioned the great things you can do when you join societies, but I had the awesome opportunity through the University Philological Society to see the first Minister of Scotland, Nicola Sturgeon speak, and I feel like I should stress it again. The Hist (College Historical Society) and the Phil (University Philosophical Society) are both debating societies within Trinity, and I highly recommend joining one as they host some great speakers every term.

Hist

Nicola Sturgeon was being presented an honorary membership in the society and answered questions first from the head of the Phil and then from the audience. She was, of course, asked about Scottish Independence, as there was a referendum in September of 2014 where the Scottish people voted to decide if Scotland would remain part of the United Kingdom or become an independent country. She gave her opinion that she would love to see Scotland as an independent country and she also said she feels it could happen in her lifetime.

Nicola

She was then asked how the first ministers of Scotland felt about Brexit. For anyone who doesn’t know Brexit is, it was another referendum that took place in the United Kingdom asking the people to vote on whether they want to remain the European Union (EU). They voted to leave, but the logistics for how and when they will leave has yet to be decided. She expressed her opinion that she would like to see the parliaments of Scotland, Northern Ireland, and Wales have a say in the logistics of the departure from the EU. She also stated when asked if she thinks Brexit will lead to another referendum in Scotland, and she said that she is aware that the vote in Scotland was in favor of staying in the EU and doesn’t want the people of Scotland to be forced into something they don’t want, but she is also aware that more people may want to stay in the UK than in EU.

Before I came to Ireland I didn’t now what Brexit would affect, but through discussions in class, my visit to the dial and Nicola Sturgeon I have learned a lot. As the logistics are still being worked out, no one knows what it will affect. There are many factors that will need to be worked out between the EU and the UK, so everyone is waiting on the UK government to decide a few things. In Irish opinion, there are opportunities and fears surrounding Brexit. One huge opportunity for the economy is that business that needs headquarters in the EU and is currently headquartered the UK may move to Ireland to stay in the EU as it is the only other English speaking nation. A big fear is that, as immigration was a big issue in the discussion leading up to the referendum, Irish citizens might have a harder time getting visas and working in the UK, as before there was freedom of movement and they didn’t need a visa. There is also concern over if current EU citizens that are living in the UK will be expected to apply for visas to stay.

Mostly it’s a waiting game to see what Brexit will do, but Ireland will be just affected as the UK when it does happen. It’s a bit scary and anxious to think about as there is no way to really prepare. We will just have to wait and see what happens. I still don’t know enough about international relations and trade to predict how it will affect the US but I imagine there will be ripples that will reach us even across the pond.

Intro to Ireland – The Business Community and Gender

Grainne Hutchinson shares her observations as she attends Trinity College’s first ever women’s leadership conference while on the Student Exchange Program in Ireland. The event consisted of professionals from Microsoft, CPL Resources, UK Investment Bank, J.P. Morgan, and former McKinsey & Co Consultant.

This week I got the amazing opportunity to attended Trinity College Dublin’s first ever women’s leadership conference. The Stronger together, women in business conference featured many different women speakers as well as a Q&A panel with various women and men in leadership roles throughout business and government. The Keynote speaker was Brenda Trenowden, who is the global chair of the 30% club. The 30% club’s primary purpose is to help achieve the goal of women holding at least 30% of leadership positions throughout companies. She started by explaining as alumni of Trinity she saw her graduating law class of about 70% female, and when she moved on in her career to assisting with her law companies recruitment of graduates, she saw them take in around 70% as well. But then when you look at leadership level the number extremely drops off. She went on to explain that in her opinion there are many contributing factors as to why this happens and that by discussing this matter and the reasons, we can come to an answer on how to overcome them. I personally was shocked to hear that with 70% of graduates being women that only around 10 to 20% make it to the leadership level.

http://tba.ie/women-business-stronger-together-conference/
http://tba.ie/women-business-stronger-together-conference/

Following the Keynote speech was a panel discussion moderated by Dearbhail McDonald, the Group Business Editor for the Irish Independent (A Newspaper in Ireland). The panel consisted of Catharina Hallahan, Managing Director of Microsoft, Anne Heraty, CEO and Co-Founder, CPL Resources, Ina De, Co-Head of UK Investment Bank, J.P. Morgan, Stephan Donnelly, Independent TD and former McKinsey & Co Consultant. The panelists first answered questions put to them by the moderator and then took questions from the audience.

From this experience, I found that the gender division in the workplace is different in the UK and Ireland than in the US. For example, there is a stronger feeling here that women should be the primary carers of children, and a larger amount of women leave the workplace after having children. Ina De shared her story of when she was expecting her first child and had concerns over working after he was born. She explained that she felt that working would disadvantage her son, but in hindsight, she said she thinks he was more advantaged with her working. In her view, it gave him perception that a woman working were the normal thing to do. She also said that she feels more access to childcare will help women stay in the workforce after having children. I personally agree with her that there is a perception that woman should stay home after a baby’s born and it was interesting to learn that she thought her decision to go back to work actually helped her son more than if she had stayed home with him.

The conference was a great way to learn what challenges and differences there are in the Irish business world. In this case, the problems were very similar but that helped me to see a new view on old problems. I would highly encourage fellow students who exchange to participate in these events. They are an excellent way to get an open dialog about the business community and have any questions you have answered.

Studying Abroad: More Than Just a Resume Booster

Passing the halfway point of her time studying for a semester at the WHU-Otto Beisheim School of Management on the Student Exchange Program, Colleen Sauer reflects on some of the career focused events at WHU and how she has expanded her connections as well as developed herself professionally.

These days, it seems that every company that recruits at Ohio State is looking for some sort of international experience.  Through the Fisher Student Exchange Program I have not only gained that point on my 14513694_1413319905349229_300643295_oresume, but have been inspired by both the company presence on-campus and the diverse group of business students.

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My favorite trip so far was to Prague, Czech Republic

Though before I go into my topic for today, I wanted to give a quick update on my travels and life here.  The latter part of the first quarter was extremely fun for me, partly due to the fact that I began to meet and spend time with the German students here at WHU.

For me this made a huge difference, as I now feel much more integrated here.  There have even been situations, from figuring out my mail to needing to call Deutsche Bahn (German train company) using German, where I was able to recruit some of my kind German friends to help me.  And besides some of my technical difficulties, I have also had some fun opportunities for cultural exchange through food.  A month ago I was able to share my love of Cincinnati Skyline Chili by making a batch for some friends (it was the consequence of losing a bet in kicker, aka Football, but definitely a fun one at that!), and later I was invited to make crepes with a few other students.

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The Paulaner tent at Oktoberfest in Munich, Germany

I have had so many more wonderful adventures since when I last posted!  I have been fortunate enough to experience Euromasters (a huge sporting event with business schools across Europe) here at WHU and travel to Prague, Munich for Oktoberfest, Amsterdam, and London with my fellow tauschies.  A few weeks ago, my parents came and visited me at WHU, and at the end of the week I met them in Bacharach to accompany them during the rest of their trip.  We have several friends here in Germany so we were able to visit them in Stuttgart, Dresden, and Berlin.  Along the way we also stopped by Rothenburg and Nürnberg.  The timing of my parents’ visit worked out perfectly, due to the fact that in their second week here I actually had a break in classes.

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Big Ben in London, England

Alright, now that you’re all caught up I can move to the main point of my entry for today. Thus far, you have heard a lot about the awesome friends and travels here in Germany.  But WHU is a highly esteemed business school as well, so I have also had some awesome class experiences and opportunities for professional development!

A unique aspect of WHU that I have been able to take part in here at WHU are company presentations.  Just about every week a different company comes and offers a presentation and networking dinner.  Many of these presentations are in German, but I was able to attend the Oliver Wyman (a consulting firm) company presentation which was in English.  During the networking dinner I had conversations with representatives from the company (many of them being graduates of WHU) and I enjoyed how casual and honest the conversations seemed.  Often times I find these sort of networking encounters to be quite scripted, but when it comes to events at WHU it’s not at all the case.

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During my parents’ visit we spent time with our friends the Schröders in Stuttgart, Germany

To be honest, consulting was not something I seriously considered before coming to WHU.  I didn’t completely understand what that profession even looked like.  But due to the fact that a large percentage of WHU students enter that sector after graduation, there is a huge consulting firm presence on campus and I have been able to learn so much more about the field.  Through talking to firms at both company presentations and the career fair I started to realize that it might be a great fit for me.  I enjoy fast-paced environments, finding solutions for others, networking, and am an extremely curious person when it comes to both people and industries.  I’m now quite excited about the idea, and it’s amazing to think that had I not gone abroad for a semester at WHU, I may not have explored this option.  It may be due to the fact that I’ve stepped back a bit from my normal life in the US allowing more space to think about what I actually want after graduation, or simply because there’s a huge push towards consulting here, but either way I’m very pleased about this! Even though I’m away from Ohio State, I still interviewed and was accepted to the Fisher Emerging Consultants class next semester, and am excited to continue exploring this option.

Beyond the university-sanctioned events, attending an exclusively business institution also has its benefits.  I thoroughly enjoy the fact that Ohio State has a plethora of majors available, with that comes such a diverse student population in terms of talents and perspectives.  But there’s also something to be said for WHU, where you can talk about business internships, aspirations, and issues with everyone you meet.  There’s certainly a unique drive and ambitious character to WHU students when it comes to business.  Never before had I been in a room with 4 other young college students, speculating over dinner about the future of the labor market as digitization improves.  To be around these students is truly inspiring! Additionally, the tauschie population is comprised of business students from top-notched schools around the globe, so there’s such a diverse set of backgrounds and business perspectives represented.  It’s safe to say that my network has become much larger and more international while abroad!

I’ve definitely been able to travel and have a ton of fun while abroad.  That’s to be expected, but my time here is becoming much more valuable than simply bragging rights due to places I’ve traveled and something to stick on my resume, hoping that companies will see that I have an “international perspective”. I’ve become a better leader, much more flexible, open-minded, yet confident in expressing my own opinions. I truly have learned so much so far, both personally and professionally!