Traveling Smart with Your Smartphone

I have publicly rebelled against having a smartphone since high school, when all of my friends made the transition. I did not believe they were worth the expense, but when I decided to spend a semester abroad, I realized there could be some advantages. Most notably, having a smartphone gives you access to a GPS which is extremely helpful when you’re lost. Additionally, there are many moments when you’ll need to look up things you wouldn’t have expected, such as the opening hours of a restaurant or store. Internet isn’t as widespread in Europe as I was used to it being in the States, so having a data plan was essential for me to manage my time effectively. I found my data plan to be cheaper than the one in the States, however I did have less data, which required me to be selective with my access. I recommend getting the proper simcard and plan in your host country as soon as possible. This will also be good when you meet new friends at orientation and in your classes, as you can swap numbers right away!

There are also a lot of very helpful apps. Here are a few that I used while abroad:

Word Lens
Worried about getting to a restaurant and not knowing how to order in another language? This app translates the words of any picture you provide, offline. It’s extremely effective when you want to translate a whole paragraph instead of having to type each word individually, and also a lifesaver when you don’t have internet access. I would also recommend getting another translator app with audio, if your phone doesn’t already come with one.

Google Voice/Whatsapp
By now, most people know about Whatsapp. It is a free messaging app for anyone with a smartphone to connect. There is also an app called Google Voice, which works a bit differently. Google Voice actually gives you a vacant US number (if you set it up while you’re still in the States) and then allows you to call and text via this number to US and Canada numbers for free. Neither of my parents have smart phones, and a lot of my friends in the US didn’t have Whatsapp, so I used Google voice to text them. Once you set up the number, you can download the app and text them like you would normally, as long as you have access to internet. Then, you can call them via Hangouts which is directly connected to Google Voice. (Technically, you can call them via Google Voice as well, however if it is connected to your US # it will not work when you get a new simcard)

Instead of dropping hundreds of dollars on Rosetta Stone or an extra language class, Duolingo is a free website and app that allows you to practice a language in an easy and fun way. The app focuses on language you would actually use (for the most part, one exception was when it taught me how to say “I am a butterfly” in French), and goes at whatever pace you are comfortable. I would argue it’s not necessarily sufficient to learn the language totally, but as a beginner or someone trying to refresh their memory, it is a great tool.

CityMaps 2 Go
This app downloads maps of major cities (you get 4 free!) that you can access offline. It is perfect for traveling, and easily highlights tourist hotspots to visit. It’s much easier than carrying a map everywhere, and you can put a thumbnail on key locations (such as your hostel) on it as well, incase you get lost.

At the risk of sounding motherly, I strongly advice you to get this app for safety reasons. If you are going to a hostel by yourself, or on a date with someone you just met, or any other situation you are wary about, you can sign up for this app to check in on you at a designated time. If you don’t respond, it will alert your friends or other emergency contacts. Even if you don’t have a smartphone, you can sign up for this free service online.

Lastly, if there is some sort of Kill Switch you can download on your phone (Android and iPhone both have it), I recommend getting it. Europe is notorious for pickpockets, and I had the unfortunate experience of having my phone stolen. I called my parents immediately, and my phone provider got me a new phone within 6 days, making the process as painless as possible. Another friend of mine was not as lucky, and had to buy a basic phone to use for the rest of the trip. In the beginning of the trip, I found I was very vigilant over my belongings, but as time passed, I became more relaxed. My phone was taken when there was only a month left in my program. On a positive note, as I had personal information on my phone (from Venmo to Amazon), I was extremely thankful I could delete all of this information after my phone was taken.

Remember, the most important thing when you’re traveling is to be smart and safe. With the right Apps, your smartphone can make your travel experience that much easier and more enjoyable!

Job Hunting While Abroad

Searching for a Full Time job in the United States while abroad started out as perhaps one of the most difficult challenges I’ve ever had to face. As I entered my Consulting Major at Audencia Ecole de Management, I thought that I might want to pursue a career in consulting. While the major showed me that this wasn’t a field I wanted to enter into directly, it equipped me with a lot of great skills for presenting and case interviews.

Additionally, I applied for a few interviews via FisherConnect, and with the help of Mark Wilson from Fisher’s IT Department, was able to Skype interview from abroad. All of the interviewers commended Fisher for making it so easy for them, and I also appreciate the time they dedicated to ensuring my interviews went smoothly. It was nice to always see the familiar face of Mr. Wilson before I went forward with my interviews!

Overall, the process definitely had some added stresses, but Fisher’s resources made it much easier to apply and get in contact with companies. I also sought out a few companies outside of the ones that normally recruit at Fisher, and found the process to go smoothly. Some companies did request to send me back to the United Staes for a second round interview, which certainly made the process more difficult. Others, offered to interview me when I returned in December.

Audencia Ecole de Management offers a number of resources for job hunting, including resume reviews in both English and French. The school also has its own job fair, called the Audencia Forum, in early October. These jobs are typically in Europe, and more specifically, France. Currently, I would like to work in the States, so I neglected to attend. However, there were many top companies such as Ernst & Young, Amazon, and Unilever. If you are planning to apply abroad, it is imporant to note that they use a different format for resumes (CVs).

My advice for anyone who is wondering about studying abroad in the semester while they are seraching for jobs, is to go for it. The path ahead will require a lot of research before you leave, and it will make things more complicated, but I definitely believe it is worth it. So many of my interviewers commented on how they loved their study abroad semesters, or wished they had gone abroad during their undergrad. I’m happy to report that I have accepted a full time offer, and have gotten to enjoy this semester to the fullest, even with the pressure of the job hunt!

The Class Structure in France

Never in my life did I think I would be able to sit still for 4 hours. The shock of the French system of classes is hard to take in when it varies so significantly from the American system. I had been used to taking a few classes a day for periods from an hour to two for the three years of my education. However, in France, the material is much more concentrated. We take one or two courses all day for 2 blocks of 3-4 hours. My easy days begin at 9am where I work till 12pm. Then, we have lunch for two hours, and class resumes from 2-5pm. We are usually lucky to get a 10minute break in this period, in which everyone runs to the coffee machine. The classes are mostly lecture based or group project based. There are a lot of group presentations throughout the class, and we are asked to evaluate one another on the spot. Our homework is generally reading chapters and cases, and I have yet to have any mathematical work. Additionally, my school, Audencia Ecole de Management, has a very special structure. For the first two weeks, we only take elective classes (1 or 2) and this tends to leave your schedule more open. However, afterwards the core or major classes begin. I am currently enrolled in the Consulting Major program which is one of the more rigorous and project oriented. The program is incredibly interesting, and I feel that I was able to learn a lot about the industry which I have never had much exposure to in Fisher. It is nice to apply the analytical skills we acquire throughout our classes at Fisher to the problems we are faced with. My class is composed of 2/3 international students and 1/3 French which also leads to a lot of interesting inputs and learnings. All in all, the Audencia classes have proved challenging but very valuable! We are presenting to a large consulting firm, Capgemini in just a few short weeks! I cannot wait for such an awesome opportunity.

This was my schedule for Week 4, within my Consulting Major

This was my schedule for Week 4, within my Consulting Major