The Idea of “Kaisu”

Officially, it’s Week 4 of my semester here at Singapore Management University. Only 9 more weeks to go before it finals time! Not that I want the semester to come to end, it’s been amazing living and studying out here.

My new campus!

I’ve been experiencing so many new things here and adjusting to everything at the same time. I find that Singapore is not much of a culture shock for me as I’ve been to Asia before. What I find interesting is however is the myriad of cultures here. Singapore has four national languages- English, Mandarin, Malay, and Tamil. Every day I find myself hearing all four languages. Singapore is still a mystery to me because it’s hard to pinpoint what precisely the Singaporean culture is. It’s a wonderful mix of the West and the East.

Before I got here, I didn’t realize that I would be adjusting to SMU (Singapore Management University) culture in additional the local culture. The culture at my university is a whole new ballpark. I’ve noticed that the academic competition is fiercer here. In fact, it’s straight up cutthroat. There’s a Singlish word here (Singlish is a unique blend of English, Mandarin, Malay, Tamil, and local dialects that is spoken in casual conversation) called Kiasu that means, “fear of losing”. Kiasu is a part of Singaporean culture as people grow up ingrained with the notion that hard work will get you ahead. It also means that Singaporeans are generally very competitive by nature in all aspects of their lives.

The idea of Kiasu became even clearer after my class discussion today. I’m taking a class called “Current Issues in Business, Society, and Government” and today we talked about Singapore’s education system. We watched a movie called, “I Not Stupid” by Jack Neo which is about three boys who are at a disadvantage because they’ve been streamlined into EM3. In the past, Singapore used to streamline students into three academic streams (EM1, EM2, EM3), the best students were placed in EM1 and the students who learned at a lower pace were placed into EM3. Although EM3 was supposed to create a learning environment suitable for students who needed a slower pace, it actually had negative effects for the students because it created a stigma that these students were “stupid”. There was also no possibility that EM3 students would move up the ranks. All of this relied on an examination that students took around age 10. As you can imagine, growing up here is very different than growing up in the US.

One of the best things about studying abroad is the exposure to different societies, cultures, and ideas that I would have not realized if I wasn’t here such as the idea of Kaisu. I’m constantly learning something new each day and I look forward to sharing all of these experiences through this blog!

Going Global with Fisher

Welcome to the Fisher Global Experiences blog. The Office of Global Business (OGB) is a resource to undergraduate and graduate students with the intention of enhancing the educational experience through international experience and exposure. In doing so, students will gain the knowledge and skills eagerly sought after by employers in today’s global marketplace. Students participating in OGB programs will write here about their experiences at Fisher and around the world.

Interested in one of Fisher’s global offerings?

One unique opportunity available to first year FisherDirect students is the Freshman Global Lab. This program enables students to study abroad during their first year at The Ohio State University by traveling to four compelling centers of commerce—the UK, Belgium, the Netherlands, and Germany.

As Fisher students enter their second year, they gain the opportunity to attend short-term study programs that can also provide academic credit to their major. The Emerging Markets Field Study is one such opportunity that gives students the opportunity to enhance their knowledge of business opportunities in developing economies, and prepares them to conduct business in foreign markets.

The Green Business program is another short-term program that provides students the opportunity to examine the initiatives of organizations that have integrated sustainability-focused business practices into their operations. The course looks at the business scene from the perspective of indigenous entrepreneurs, multinational operations, and Costa Rica based companies.

Semester-long Student Exchange is undoubtedly the best immersion experience an undergraduate can have abroad at Ohio State. The Office of Global Business has established the partnership that allows students to learn at top global institutions without paying the extra tuition and earning transferable-credit for their major.

Students can gain global work experience and valuable cultural awareness during Fisher’s Global Summer Internship Programs located in countries that are strategic to international business.  Locations currently include Australia, England, France, Germany, Hong Kong, New Zealand, and Singapore. The internships are eight weeks in length and are selected specifically chosen to compliment the strengths, abilities, and interests of the Fisher student-intern.

Students who still hope to gain global skills and competencies in a paid internship now have the opportunity to so right here in Ohio through the Export Internship Program (EIP).  EIP features a small, specialized export-focused course during the Spring Semester with a twelve week summer internship placement with a small to medium Ohio business looking to increase their exports.

Graduate students have the option of participating in the new Global Applied Projects Program (GAP). GAP students  gain international experience by working on a business challenge with one of Fisher’s corporate partners.  GAP combines a Spring Semester second session international strategy course and a May term global project with a major client designed to differentiate your work experience.