Posts Tagged 'GMAT'

New this year – GRE or GMAT accepted

Beginning this year, the MBA program is accepting either the GRE or the GMAT to be considered for admission to the Full-Time MBA program.  That being said, the GMAT is the only standardized test that was specifically designed to help predict success in core MBA classes.  If you have not taken either test and you are debating about which one to take, we do prefer the GMAT.  If, on the other hand, you have already taken the GRE, by all means feel free to submit those scores with your MBA application.

Since we have not been accepting the GRE for a long time, we do not have historic data to provide with respect to class averages or score ranges.  What I can tell you is that the average GMAT of the class of 2014 was a 667.  If you take a quick look at the comparison tool below, you can get an idea of how GRE scores compare to GMAT scores.  This is obviously just a rough guide, but may help to give you some insight into the score ranges we will be looking for.  For additional information on Fisher’s test score requirements, click here.


Get ready for the new GMAT!

If you are thinking about applying to MBA programs this fall, you probably are aware that the GMAT is changing next month – June 5, 2012 to be exact!  The Graduate Management Admissions Council is introducing a new Integrated Reasoning (IR)section into the Next Generation GMAT.    The IR section will include texts, charts and/or tables; mult-source reasoning; graphics interpretation and two-part analysis.  You get to use an on-screen calculator with this section – exciting!

The verbal and quantitative sections will not change and will still comprise the score on the 800 scale that you are used to seeing.  The IR section will have a separate score on an 8 point scale.  A main difference with the addition of the IR section is the switch to just one analytical writing assessment. 

The new test format will look like this:

30 minute Analytical Writing Assessment

30 minute Intergrated Reasoning Section

75 minute Quantitative Section

75 minutes Verbal Section

Total 3 hours, 30 minutes (4 hours total time commitment, including breaks)

You may be wondering how business schools are going to evaluate applicants using this new section.  Honestly, it is too early to tell.  I know that I am excited about the opportunity to evaluate candidates based on skills that are highly relevant and criticial to academic success in a business school classroom.  The questions in this section will ask you to synthesize, analyze, and organize information from a variety of sources to draw a conclusion and solution to a problem.  Since we have no historic scoring data, we have nobody to compare to, so my thought is that the first test takers of the new section have an advantage – you can set the bar for those to come after you!  I do not anticipate that the scores on this section will have a dramatic impact on admissions this next cycle.  Once we all have a better idea of how the section is scored and what the correlation is between scores on this section and performance in the classroom, we will have a much better sense of how much weight to put on it.  In the meantime, happy studying and good luck!  Visit mba.com to register for the GMAT and access practice tests.

One important note – with the addition of the new section, it will take a bit longer for us to get your scores.  We have been told that it will take about 20 days to receive them.  Please give yourself enough time to take the exam when planning around your application deadlines.

 


The New GMAT – are you ready for it?

GMAT is undergoing a significant revision within the next few months. In June 2012, the GMAT will introduce an integrated reasoning section, testing concepts that have not been tested before on the GMAT. The current version of the GMAT has a verbal section, a quantitative section, and two essays. The new version will drop one of the essays and replace it with an integrated reasoning section.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wJLwiwRsQAM

What does this mean for you? If you are reading this and are applying to the Fisher MBA program for spring semester 2013, you can either take the GMAT before or after the changes are implemented – the program does not prefer one over the other. As long as your scores are valid scores, they can be used as part of a complete application. Remember that scores are good for up to five years from the time you take it.

For more information, please check the FAQ published by GMAC. (Click here if you’d like to see some sample questions from the new integrated reasoning section.)


The Next Generation GMAT – coming soon!

I just returned from the Graduate Management Admission Council (GMAC) Annual Industry Conference where I had the chance to network with my peers from other business schools and learn about new products and services from GMAC, the creators and owners of the GMAT exam.  As you may know, a new version of the GMAT will debut in June 2012.  Here is what you need to know:

  • The new version of the GMAT will include an integrated reasoning section
  • This section will be 30 minutes in length and will be taken either right before or right after the analytical writing segment
  • The analytical writing segment will be 30 minutes in length and only include one essay – analysis of an argument
  • The integrated reasoning section will initially have its own score – the score will NOT be factored into the total score that is comprised of the verbal and quantitative sections
  • The integrated reasoning section will include 12-15 questions and will not be computer adaptive like the rest of the test
  • Question types will include multi-source reasoning, table analysis, two-part analysis, and graphics interpretation

If you are taking the test before next June, you don’t need to worry about any of this.  For those of you that are planning way ahead – keep this in mind as you prepare!  Study guides for the Next Generation GMAT will be available in April 2012.


Summmer steps to prepare for your MBA application

Take these steps towards your future!

 
If you are beginning to think about applying to MBA programs this fall, there are a number of things you can work on this summer to get ready:

1) Begin your research on programs to determine which one is going to be the best fit for you (hopefully it is Fisher!).  Visit the program websites, read the admissions blogs (great job!), read the current student blogs to get a sense of what life is like as a student at Fisher.  Learn about opportunities to visit campus or connect with members of the admissions staff

2) Prepare for the GMAT exam.  Visit mba.com for all of the information you could possibly want to learn about the test, study guides, resources and free, downloadable, full length practice tests.  Most schools will look at your highest score, but ideally you only have to take the test once at $250 per attempt!

3) Think about who will serve as your references.  Many MBA programs now use electronic reference forms.  By the time your recommender receives the link to complete the reference form and upload the letter of support, he/she should already know what to expect and be prepared to complete the process.  Fisher prefers professional references over academic references, unless you are a recent graduate from an undergraduate or graduate program and have a strong relationship with a professor who can speak to your potential for success in the MBA program.  Current supervisors are our first choice for a reference, followed by previous supervisors, colleagues, clients, or individuals with whom you work in the community or in a professional organization outside of your primary place of employment.

4) Request transcripts from your undergraduate institution(s) early.  Sometimes it takes awhile for those transcripts to arrive, so don’t wait until the last minute.  Check to see if the MBA programs to which you are applying will accept electronic copies of transcripts.  Fisher is now able to accept scanned or electronic copies of transcripts for academic review during the application process.  Official hardcopies will be requested after you are offered admission and prior to enrollment, unless the electronic transcript is sent directly to OSU from the granting institution and is considered official. 

5) Begin thinking about your essays.  Our essay questions are posted online so you can review them before you even begin an application.  The essays will really give you a chance to highlight elements of your personality, personal accomplishments, interesting aspects of your background and experience, etc. - they give you the best chance to differentiate yourself, so spend some time thinking about how you want to be perceived by the admissions committe.

Our application for Fall 2012 should be available as of August 1, 2011.  In the meantime, please click here to be added to our database and to request more information about Fisher.


Not happy with your GMAT score? Here is some advice.

You are preparing your application to the MBA program.  You filled in the online application, wrote, rewrote and finalized your essays, secured your letters of recommendation, updated your resume and requested your transcripts to be sent.  The last item on the checklist is every MBA applicant’s favorite four-letter word…the GMAT.  You took the GMAT, thinking you were going to ace it after all of those hours of intense preparation.  You finished the exam, agreed to view your scores and…oh, MAN, you have got to be kidding me?!  THAT is my score?

Sound familiar?

If this sounds like you and you are planning to apply by the December 15 deadline, you have a couple of choices:

1) Apply as planned and wait to hear from the Admissions Committee regarding next steps in the admissions process – maybe your score isn’t as high as you had hoped, but maybe it isn’t that bad after all

2) Apply as planned, but indicate to the Admissions Committee that you plan to retake the test on a future date and request that a decision is not made on your application until the new test score comes in

A few points to remember:

  • The Admissions Committee will review all of the application materials carefully.  The GMAT is important, but it is just one part of the application.
  • The GMAT was designed to help business schools determine your potential to succeed academically in core MBA classes.  It is possible that you have enough other evidence in your application of strong academic potential and the GMAT may be less important.
  • Be self aware – look at our class profiles.  Are your qualifications consistent with those of other students in our program?  Manage your expectations.
  • If you are interested in being considered for merit-based financial aid, the two quantitative measures primarily used to evaluate candidates are the undergraduate GPA and the GMAT.  Most of you are unable to impact your undergraduate GPA at this point.  If you feel that your GMAT score is sufficient for admission, but you believe you have the potential to do better, it may be worthwhile to retake for the possibility of funding.
  • The average increase on a GMAT retake is 30 points.  Most people perform the same or do worse.  We only recommend that you retake the test if the circumstances around the test day were not ideal or if you have some reason to believe that you did not perform to your maximum potential.
  • If you do plan to retake, give yourself plenty of time.  We recommend about 6-8 weeks of preparation – don’t rush into it before you are ready!

Good luck!!

You can do it!

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