FISHER NEWS  
Economic advice for the new administration from faculty

A few weeks before Election Day, several members of Fisher faculty offered their thoughts and ideas on what should be on the economic agenda for the new Congress and Administration that will take office in January. Here are some of their recommendations:

Jay Anand
Jay Anand
W.C. Benton
W.C. Benton
 
Richard Dietrich
Richard Dietrich
 
Oded Shenkar
Oded Shenkar
 
Jay Anand, Associate Professor, Corporate Strategy and International Business:

“Two of the issues that matter when it comes to mergers and acquisitions and stock buy-backs are CEO compensation and corporate taxes. One of the reasons there has been so much debt and leverage is because of how firms have compensated their top employees. Those types of policies need to be revisited. There will be enough clamor to do so. CEO pay is a politically juicy target and it makes economic sense to do something about it.”


W.C. Benton, Edwin D. Dodd Professor of Management:
“The objective of the U.S. health care delivery system must be to provide affordable, accessible, high quality and cost effective health care for all Americans. The Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), private insurers, health maintenance organizations (HMO’s) must begin to measure and reward quality and efficiency for both traditional and non traditional healthcare delivery strategies. The next U.S. Congress should address the following quality and efficiency metrics: Provider information reporting, using an accessible national database of cost and quality data; implementation of a national electronic medical record database system; development of standardized clinical quality guidelines.”


Richard Dietrich, Chair and Professor of Accounting and MIS:
“There is a proposal now to merge Securities and Exchange Commission and the Commodity Futures Trading Commission. Lots of thorny issues have to be addressed with financial reporting and security regulations. Should we adopt a common worldwide accounting standard, or retain the U.S. accounting standard only for companies in the U.S.? The SEC has already authorized the use of international financial reporting standards (IFRS). Congress and the administration have to take that on.”


Oded Shenkar, Ford Motor Company Chair in Global Business Management:
“China is holding a lot of our paper. They won’t dump it yet. It’s ironic that we have resisted investment coming out of China. Nobody is talking about the China sovereign wealth fund, but they have a lot of money: $1.5 trillion in reserve in China. Using some of it to invest in failing banks would be helpful.”