FISHER NEWS February 9, 2007
  In this issue

MAcc student cast as “extra” in major motion picture

Benton: Financial health of America's hospitals in critical condition in evolving health-care economy

Fisher students excel at case competitions

Made it Happen campaign launched to tout success stories of recent graduates

Fisher People: Alan Lin













Max M. Fisher College of Business > The Ohio State University Fisher College of Business
MAcc student cast as “extra” in
major motion picture

Jered Green models some of the 1970s clothing he wore as an extra in the movie "We Are Marshall."
Jered Green
Much like any other Hollywood success story, Jered Green happened to be in the right place at the right time, which landed him a spot on the silver screen in the motion picture “We Are Marshall.”

Green, a MAcc student, was finishing up his senior year at Marshall University when film makers arrived on campus for three weeks of shooting last April. Green was given a very small non-speaking part in the production after auditioning during an open casting call for extras. The film, released last December, depicts the 1970 airplane crash that claimed the lives of 75 players, coaches, staff and boosters and the university’s efforts to restore the school’s football program following the tragedy.

Green unexpectedly found himself in front of the camera during one of the film’s emotional, pivotal moments. After appearing in scenes earlier in the day, Green was standing-by with other extras watching subsequent shooting from a window in the Marshall Student Center. Suddenly, a coordinator flung open the door and pulled him into the key scene opposite actor Arlen Escarpeta, who played the injured senior quarterback, Reggie Oliver.

“The assistant director came over and sat with me and said here is what is going on in this scene and what I needed to do and I actually started getting kind of nervous,” Green said. “This was a close scene there were only about a dozen people in it and those are the type of scenes you want to be in because you have a greater chance of being seen in it.”

In the scene, Escarpeta’s character is one of three players that weren’t aboard the ill-fated aircraft. The film’s starring actor makes a passionate plea to Green’s character and the other extras who are freshman football players. The surviving player rallies the younger players to gather student support for the program before the university’s board of governors meeting.

Before the December pre-screening, Green had no idea if his scenes would show up on the big screen or if they would end up on the cutting room floor. As it turned out, two of his earlier scenes—one as a mourner and another as a student studying on the night of the plane crash—did not make the final cut. So he became anxious when his final climatic scene finally appeared onscreen.

“I was real nervous about seeing it and I almost didn’t recognize myself because I had forgotten what I had worn in wardrobe that day,” he said. “I was like that’s me. I had other friends that were in the movie only in passing or that I never saw at all. But there I was along side one of the key actors. I was awestruck.”

As both a Marshall alumnus and participant in the production, Green said he is proud of the picture and believes it is a fitting tribute to the men who lost their lives when the airplane went down near the campus.

“To have a small part in a major motion picture is exciting and thrilling in itself; but to be able to tell such an inspiring story about your community and university is even more special.” He said. “Members of the Marshall community still feel the pain from that fateful night in November 1970. This film serves as a memorial for the lives lost and demonstrates how a community can rise from the ashes and grab glory.”

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Scholar Spotlight

Benton: Financial health of America's hospitals in critical condition in evolving health-care economy


W.C. Benton's research suggests that the current business model is flawed and it could have drastic effects on the uninsured, poor and immigrant populations.


With a newly published purchasing textbook and an endowed professorship in management, W.C. Benton at first glance might appear to be a classic business scholar.

Yet, he demonstrates concern for the plight of uninsured populations and his research in health-care management cuts across many disciplines. It delves into federal and state policy, bio-health and life sciences and social issues such as providing medical care for the unemployed and poor.

“It’s an exciting area to work in,” said Benton, who was named the Edwin D. Dodd Professor of Management last November. “It’s overwhelming too.”

Hospitals, pharmaceutical companies, government agencies, physician partnerships, insurance companies and group purchasing organizations are a sampling of organizations that Benton examines in his research.

A recently published article on hospital profitability that Benton co-authored with local physicians Drs. Thomas E. Williams and Sarah Greenberger paints a dismal picture of the economics of medicine and health-care.

“The low levels of profitability suggest that the current hospital business model is flawed,” according to the article published by the American College of Physician Executives. “The new economics of the health-care industry cannot be managed under traditional health-care systems approaches. The current hospital business model is simply not sustainable.”

Benton believes the health-care business is in critical condition, particularly hospitals. “We were looking at the best hospitals and they only have a two-percent price structure,” he said about the study. The article can be found online at www.acpe.org/ Publications/LeadingEdge/2006/Fall/benton.htm.

Compounding the crisis is a new Medicare patient reclassification that came out last October. The federal government plans to reclassify patients depending on the severity of their conditions, replacing its 20-year-old system of categories with 861 new ones. Medicare currently pays more than $125 billion a year to more than 5,000 hospitals. “A lot of hospitals are going to go out of business because they won’t be able to compete. The pressure of the new pricing structure will be too much given the fact they have too much overhead already,” he said.

In response to economic pressures, a lot of hospitals are transforming into specialty hospitals, Benton said. The new government pricing structure is accelerating that trend.

“The hospitals have to become more efficient to meet that target price. That’s where the problem is. People (doctors and hospital executives) want to work on the profitable procedures and not the unprofitable ones,” Benton said, adding that he predicts a lot of traditional hospitals will be forced out of business. “It would take a lot for them to get to a lean size in order for them to compete with specialty hospitals.”

Benton said he is very concerned about what that means for patients, especially the uninsured, poor and children.

“The question is: ‘what is going to be the disposition of the patient when all of this happens?’ Where are they going to go?” he asked.

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Fisher students excel at case competitions


Undergraduate students Julie Hoopes, Isaac Elking and Brian Schoo at the Operation Stimulus Logistics Case Competition last month in Denver.


Undergraduate students Julie Hoopes, Isaac Elking and Brian Schoo might have had the smallest team at the Operation Stimulus Logistics Case Competition in Denver last month, but that didn’t stop them from taking top honors.

Up against teams from 11 other universities with four to six students on each squad, the Fisher group successfully prepared effective solutions for an apparel manufacturer looking for ways to improve profitability by reducing logistics costs while improving revenue.

“I wasn’t worried about having a smaller team than the other schools because I knew that these three students had the experience and brainpower to develop and present a compelling solution that would impress the judges,” said Keely Croxton, assistant professor of logistics. “It just meant that they each had to put more time into preparing than the other teams and fortunately they were willing to do that.”

The team, which was sponsored by Daimler-Chrysler, had four days to work on the case before flying to Denver for the competition. During their prep time, they interviewed executives from The Limited and The Gap to understand the industry challenges and gain insight on leading-edge practices.

An hour before the presentation, the teams were given a twist to the case, which they had to incorporate into their proposed solution. The top three teams presented in the second round of the competition, where another new challenge was thrown at them just an hour before that presentation.

Closer to home at the Fisher First Year MBA Case Competition, a record 21 teams presented to a panel of nearly 30 industry and faculty judges.

The team of Christina Deitch, Ryan Jackson, Lisa Scheiring and David Smith took top honors. Tony Obergefell was named the top presenter in the final round and Scheiring was honored for the best question and answer session.

In the opening round six teams were recognized as finalists and earned the opportunity to be considered for spots on the Fisher teams for the Big Ten Case Competition and the CIBER Case Challenge this spring.

First round individual award winners included, for best question and answer session, Natalie Siston, Ryan Mcafee, William Knue, Russ Efird, Naynesh Khamar and John Kostelac. Best Presenter awards went to Jesse Geiger, Jamie Levine, Asad Lodhi, Vinita Wadhwani, Chris Khoury and Schiering.

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MBA "Made It Happen" Campaign launched to tout success stories of recent graduates
The MBA program launched the "Made it Happen" campaign featuring recent alumni who described their Fisher experiences and how it led to career success at prominent companies worldwide.

The first of the monthly series began with a distribution of post cards, fliers and electronic display board messaging spotlighting Jane Zachariah.

To read Jane's story and future profiles of other alumni, visit fisher.osu.edu/makeithappen by clicking the thumbnail image above.





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Fisher People: Alan Lin
 
Title: System Specialist for Executive Education

Hobbies:Playing guitar, volunteering at the CHA (Citizens for Humane Action) Animal Shelter, becoming a volunteer lifeguard instructor and working out at the RPAC.

FisherLure: "I like working at Fisher because of my great co-workers and getting the chance to meet students from around the world."


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Calendar of Events

Feb. 12
Dean Joe Alutto will speak about the future of Fisher and how he manages the college. His speech is a part of the Cullman Executive Luncheon Series from 12:20 to 1:20 p.m. in 161 Gerlach Hall. More information is available online at fisherrsvp.student-hub.com.

The Undergraduate Business Women’s Association, Undergraduate Business Council and Fisher Citizenship Program will host an etiquette dinner at the Viewpoint Bistro in Drake Union from 7 to 9 p.m. More information is available online at ubwa.org.ohio-state.edu.

Feb. 13
Bill Nolen, partner at Squire Sanders & Dempsey, will speak about his article and experiences with employment and mental health issues of employees as a part of the Graduate Human Resources Association meeting from 5 to 6 p.m. in 365 Gerlach Hall. More information is available online at fisherrsvp.student-hub.com.

A representative from Ryan and Company will speak at the Accounting Association meeting at 7:30 p.m. in 305 Schoenbaum Hall. More information is available online at student.cob.ohio-state.edu.

Jon Iveson, of the Buckeye Gazelles Association, will speak at the Business Builders Club meeting. The event is co-hosted by the Buckeye Gazelles Association, a group devoted to stimulate the efforts of young entrepreneurs. The meeting will be at 7:30 p.m. in 230 Schoenbaum Hall. More information is available online at www.business buildersclub.org.

A representative from Limited Brands will present at the Information Systems Association meeting at 7:30 p.m. in 215 Schoenbaum Hall. More information is available online at www.ohiostateisa .org.

Feb. 14
Anthony Ham,
a financial advisor with Ameriprise Financial, will discuss how common sense and commitment contribute to building wealth at the Black MBA Association lunch from 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. in 315 Gerlach Hall. More information is available online at fisherrsvp.student-hub.com.

A representative from Ernst & Young will present at the American Marketing Association meeting. Pizza will be served at 7 p.m. in 319 Schoenbaum Hall and the meeting will start at 7:30 p.m. in 330 Schoenbaum Hall. More information is available online at ama.org.ohio-state.edu.

Feb. 15
Career Services will host a session to help international students learn how to network from 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. in 161 Gerlach Hall. More information is available online at fisherrsvp.student- hub.com.


FisherServes is sponsoring a dinner at Mongolian Barbecue, 295 Marconi Blvd with proceeds benefiting the Hunger Alliance. More information is available online at fisherrsvp.student-hub .com.

Feb. 16
The Center for Operational Excellence and the Operational Logistics Management Association will host its quarterly seminar for second-year MBA students from 1 to 4 p.m. in 140 Pfahl Hall. More information is available online at fisherrsvp.student-hub.com.

Feb. 19
Bryan J. Gillum, director of college relations for Cardinal Health, will speak as a part of the Cullman Executive Luncheon Series from 12:20 to 1:20 p.m. in 161 Gerlach Hall. More information is available online at fisherrsvp.student- hub.com.

A representative from Limited Brands will present at the Hispanic Business Student Association at 7:30 p.m. in 220 Schoenbaum Hall. More information is available online at hbsa.org.ohio-state.edu.

Feb. 20
Karen Hopper Wruck, associate dean for MBA programs, will speak at a student executive lunch from 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. in 275 Gerlach Hall. More information is available online at fisherrsvp.student-hub.com.

A representative from Capital One will speak at the Accounting Association meeting at 7:30 p.m. in 305 Schoenbaum Hall. More information is available at student.cob.ohio-state.edu.

Kristin Kazimour of EdgePark Medical Supplies will discuss distribution and logistics at the Transportation and Logistics Association meeting. Pizza will be served at 7 p.m. in 209 Schoenbaum Hall and the meeting will start at 7:30 p.m. in 215 Schoenbaum Hall. More information is available online at www.osutla.com.

Feb. 21
A representative from Total Quality Logistics will speak at the American Marketing Association meeting. Pizza will be served at 7 p.m. in 319 Schoenbaum Hall and the meeting will start at 7:30 p.m. in 330 Schoenbaum Hall. More information is available online at ama.org.ohio-state.edu.

Mark Jensen, leader of Deloitte & Touche LLP Venture Capital practice, will be describing the venture capital process at the Business Builders Club meeting at 6 p.m. in 140 Pfahl Hall. More information is available online at www.businessbuildersclub.org.

A representative from Cisco Systems will present at the Information Systems Association meeting at 7:30 p.m. in 215 Schoenbaum Hall. More information is available online at www.ohiostateisa .org.

Barbara Shepard, COO of the Global Purchasing Group, will speak at the Undergraduate Business Women’s Association from 7:30 to 8:30 p.m. in 220 Schoenbaum Hall. More information is available online at ubwa.org.ohio-state.edu.

Feb. 23
Len Schlesinger
, COO/Vice Chairman Limited Brands, will speak at a leadership and professional development session at 12:45 p.m. in the Ohio Stadium Recruitment Room. More information is available online at fisherrsvp.student-hub.com.

News Briefs
Undergrad faculty/student mixer set for Feb. 13
The annual undergraduate Student/Faculty Mixer hosted by the Undergraduate Business Council will be held from 5:30 – 7:30 p.m. in the Blackwell Ballrooms.

The mixer is an opportunity for students to interact with faculty members. Dean Joe Alutto will also be in attendance to present the Undergraduate Teaching Awards.

Students should dress professionally and RSVP for the event by e-mailing Teresa Smith at smith.5164@osu.edu.

Applications for Wheeler Internship Program available
The Center for Entrepreneurship through the Thomas L. Wheeler Entrepreneurship Internship Program is now accepting applications for internships with entrepreneurial companies for the next round of placements during summer quarter.

Each year the center places several top-level graduate and senior undergraduate students in local entrepreneurial companies and venture capital firms to assist with exciting projects such as market research, financial planning and business development.

Several previous student interns in this program have gone on to full-time employment with their host companies. Don’t miss out on this one-of-a-kind opportunity. Salaries are competitive and the real world experience gained with a high-end entrepreneurial company is priceless. Download an application at entrepreneurship.osu.edu and submit it along with your resume to: Center for Entrepreneurship, Room 256 Fisher Hall, 2100 Neil Avenue, Columbus, Ohio 43210. The deadline to apply is March 9, 2007. You can also email your resume and application to ray.125@ osu.edu. If you have any questions, call Nancy Ray at 614-292-4085.

News Briefs

Rudi Fahlenbrach, assistant professor of finance, was quoted in numerous national publications in response to Michael Dell’s return as CEO of Dell Computers.

Fahlenbrach spoke on his research regarding boomerang CEOs with The New York Times, USA Today, Forbes, CNBC and the Dallas Morning News. His appearance on CNBC’s the Closing Bell can be viewed online.

Steve Mangum, senior associate dean, was quoted in a Jan. 25 BusinessWeek article on tactics lawmakers could use to help small businesses deal with a minimum wage hike.

Mangum told the publication lawmakers should bundle a federal minimum wage increase with a stronger Earned Income Tax Credit.

Karen Hopper Wruck
, associate dean for MBA programs, was quoted in a Jan. 27 Wall Street Journal article on the relationship between the ouster of a CEO and stock market gains.

Wruck told the paper that a company’s stock could rise due to unanticipated factors in the market rather than a new CEO.


 

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