#NewFriends

#GraduateProgramsOffice #FamilyPortrait #MHRM #MAcc #SMF #NewFriends

#FisherCollegeofBusiness #GraduateProgramsOffice #FamilyPhoto #MHRM #MAcc #SMF #NewFriends

I admit it. I am often behind on what is “trendy” and “hip,” but I’ve been seeing a lot of #nonewfriends on Twitter and Instagram. I finally took the time to look it up on Urban Dictionary though, and honestly, it is a tad #redonkulous.

I prefer, “make new friends, but keep the old.” I also think taking this approach when joining the MHRM program will get you much further both personally and professionally. We all enter the program having existing friendships and relationships, but I think it is crucial to be open to creating new ones.

I’ve mentioned on previous blogs how Fisher provides numerous opportunities to engage with peers, such as orientation, MHRM Council events, group work, and more. We also have different opportunities to get to know the Fisher MBA, MAcc, and SMF students too, which is awesome! We have two years in the program and work very closely with our peers throughout the entire duration. It makes the experience much more enjoyable if you make friends along the way.

With class sizes of roughly 50, most of us have different interests and hobbies, share different experiences and backgrounds, and also may be on different pages in life than others, so I think it becomes natural to find individuals who you may connect with better than others, but keeping an open mind and heart can elevate your experiences during your time at Fisher. Don’t be afraid to try new things, or to go outside of your comfort zone from time to time, or to socialize with people different than yourself. Most importantly, don’t let the time you have at Fisher slip away without making #newfriends.


Do You

In business school, there are so many options available to you – different majors, tracks, classes, case competitions, networking events, student organizations, internships, and other opportunities.  No one does the same thing in business school.  Sure, some people have the same major.  Others intern at the same company.  Still others are on the same student organization leadership boards.  But everyone has slightly different paths through this program.  And that’s a good thing.  So my advice to current and incoming students is this: Don’t worry about what everyone else is doing.  Do you.

This past week the Class of 2016 started Semester #2 of our MBA career.  This term was the first we were able to choose an elective.  I chose corporate finance.  Although I ultimately want to work in marketing, I also want to learn about finance while I’m at Fisher.  The first few days back were filled with people asking about each others breaks and what extra classes they were taking.  Invariably, when I gave my reply, there would be a shocked gasp and a “Why?!”

My background is in literature and creative writing, and I will freely admit that I like words better than I like numbers – but I see a lot of value in understanding numbers.  It’s important to know how to invest and save money.  It’s important to understand your finances and to know your limits – what you can and cannot afford.  Right now my philosophy about money is pretty squirrely – literally.  Birthday money?  Put it in the bank.  Christmas money?  Put it in the bank.  Everything extra goes into savings.  Always.  We’re storing up for winter, folks!  But that isn’t always the best way to do things, and especially not once you start working and making a bit of money.  So I plan to complete the investments track at Fisher and learn how to be a smart investor.  I don’t really care if I struggle with some of the topics (though I did very well in my Finance I and II classes).  I may get a B or two, and that’s okay.  What’s important is that I’m learning, and I’m learning about something I think is valuable.

And maybe a lot of people think finance is scary.  And maybe there’s a stereotype that words people can’t take numbers classes.  And maybe I will struggle more than the average finance student at times.  But ima do me.  And I’m going to get the most I possibly can out of this program.  And that’s what’s most important.

Team 13 santiago's birthday

Team 13! Abhijit is sitting on my left – he’s my corporate finance partner in crime this term!

 

 

 


Q&A with MAcc Students- Part 1

Now that it’s the first week of our second and final semester in the MAcc program, I thought it was a good time to share a bit about some of my peers, learn why they chose Fisher, and hear about their summer plans!

Here’s Part 1 of my Q&A session:

Pat Archer ’15 

pat

Where are you from?
St. Louis, Missouri

Where did you go to undergrad? What was your major and when did you graduate?
I majored in business at the University of Dallas and graduated in May 2014.

Why did you decide to get a graduate degree in accounting?
I had an outstanding liberal arts education from University of Dallas, but I wanted to build a set of
professional and technical skills as well in order to have a rewarding career in accounting.

Why did you choose Fisher MAcc?
It’s a broad-base program which fits well with both how I understand accounting
and how I would like to approach my career.

What are your post-graduation summer plans?
I plan on taking the CPA Exam and then travel the East Coast with my beautiful bride.
(Author’s note: Pat just got married on January 3!) Afterwards, I will start working
as a Staff Auditor for Deloitte in Phoenix.

Do you have an interesting fact, interest, etc. that you’d like to share?
@The_Pat_Archer is my Twitter handle. #teamfollowme

 

Danni Shi ’15

danni

Where are you from?
Ningbo, which is on the east coast of China

Where did you go to undergrad? What was your major and when did you graduate?
I majored in finance at The Ohio State University and graduated in May 2013.

Why did you decide to get a graduate degree in accounting?
I took several accounting classes as an undergrad, and I found them to be interesting and practical.
My knowledge in accounting helped me to better understand finance, and accounting skills are very important for people to have who want to work in the financial industry.

Why did you choose Fisher MAcc?
My previous roommate graduated from the Fisher MAcc program. She strongly recommended it to me and told me how nice MAcc professors are, how challenging but useful the courses are, and how much I would enjoy meeting new friends from all over the world. I knew it was the program I wanted to go to. Besides, the program is only 9 months long, which is a big attraction for me.  I enjoyed being a undergraduate student at Fisher and have fostered a strong relationship here.

What are your post-graduation summer plans?
I plan on taking the CPA Exam and going on a nice trip to Yellowstone and Glacier National Parks before I start my job as a Financial Service Office Staff Auditor at Ernst & Young in New York City.

Do you have an interesting fact, interest, etc. that you’d like to share?
I like hiking and tennis. Also, I am good at cooking Chinese food.
Fun fact: When I was young, I told everyone that being an accountant was the last job I
would choose and never ever thought I would become an accountant when I grew up.

Thanks for reading! Check out Part 2 in two weeks!


New Year, New Classes, New Goals!

After spending the New Year watching the Buckeyes beat Alabama in New Orleans, the thought of coming back to school was not the most appealing idea. However, now that I am back at Fisher and getting into the school groove, I am more than happy to be back with my fellow MAcc students and professors!

Of course at the beginning of every year everyone makes a bunch of resolutions, which are more than likely unattainable. I decided to try and break this horrendous trend and make a couple attainable goals for my next term in the MAcc –

1) Wake up early enough for breakfast – I always end up just grabbing a bar before I leave to go to class and I really want to work towards waking up and taking the time to eat something a little more substantial. I’m hoping this will make me more awake for my 8:30 am IFRS class. I really do need to work on this since I am currently eating oatmeal at work…

2) Go ice skating – This one might be cheating since the Fisher College of Business Social Chairs have organized an event and this became a goal after I received the invitation but regardless, I want to go skating for the first time!

3) Keep on top of my assignments – This term looks like it has a lot of assignments/readings due every class period. In order to deal with this, I want to utilize my time on free days and get a bulk of the reading done or at least try and keep organized enough to have everything printed off so I can read it during down time between classes or easily at home.

4) Stay busy and give back - I really want to do as much as I possibly can this semester to really stay involved and to volunteer on and off campus! I will be a Site Manager for the VITA (Volunteer Income Tax Assistance) Program and I am getting more involved with recruiting events for EY. The New Year will hopefully allow me to give back to those who have helped me in the past and to stay involved with the community!

5) Have fun! – This will definitely be the most attainable goal, it is my last semester at Ohio State and I really want to enjoy it!

We will see if these all come true or if they stick for the rest of the term — I like to think I will be able to achieve them for sure!


Time for Electives

The beginning of the SMF program was very structured: everyone takes the basic list of courses, which includes Corporate Finance I, Investment Management I, microeconomics (formally, Industry, Risk & Pricing), and several others. Certainly, one has the opportunity to take a few electives during the first two terms, but up to only three.

There are only two required courses in the third the fourth terms collectively, which are macroeconomics (formally, Global Financial Markets) and Team Projects (which are essentially client projects the program acquires for students to work on with the clients), which allows for up to ten electives in Spring semester.

Because I am specializing in corporate finance, I’ve chosen to take Corporate Finance IV with Professor Karen Hopper Wruck. Professor Wruck is a widely published and recognized expert on corporate restructuring. Our first two classes have combined cases that she has written demonstrating how value can be created through different types of restructuring (e.g., borrowing roughly the net worth of a firm, paying the proceeds out as a special dividend, and using the increased leverage to effect prioritizing cash flow).

Another elective I’m taking is Enterprise Risk Management with René Stulz. Dr. Stulz is a world-renowned expert in risk management and is a member of the Board of Trustees of the Global Association of Risk Professionals. Our first two classes have focused on the mechanics of many of the derivatives crises, such as Barings, Lehman Brothers, Orange County, and Metagesellschaft, with the primary lesson that many of these crises came about not because derivatives are inherently bad, but because derivatives, like the machinery of almost any profession, need to be handled with care and with full knowledge of the associated risks.

In terms of fascinating classes and distinguished professors, the list goes on, and I continue to both broaden my knowledge of the various areas of finance and dive deeper into corporate finance and how firms create value for creditors and shareholders. 


Back To Life, Back To Reality.

Firstly – and hopefully not to your chagrin – as a stay at home mom, I’m not going to post about the events happening around campus as much as other students because there is a shortage of babysitters (especially during the day) who will take pity on this broke mom drowning in student debt and babysit a wild 2 1/2 year old for free. The intention of the majority of my posts is to provide helpful information for potential students about the MHRM program (WHICH IS AWESOME. Not biased at all). BUT, I will include an adorable picture of my husband and son at Zoo Lights (a must see around the holidays) in this post. Bonus: my kid recently got glasses and looks like Ralphie in the picture.

Zoo Lights

Zoo Lights

After a nice long, break, I’m ready to get back into the swing of things. I’m intimidated by the workload of this semester but am also incredibly excited by my courses.

The first semester of your first year is generally filled with pretty basic, introductory-type stuff. Don’t get me wrong, you still have to work hard, but it may not be as mentally taxing as you’d expect grad school to be. Don’t let that fool you.

This second semester will be filled with data analytics, hours long excel assignments, an apparently huge project (some students have told me their final group paper was 60+ pages), an impossible change project (the word “impossible” came straight from my professor. According to him, the harder the task will be to complete, the better), and Employment Law.

While that all sounds intimidating – ahem, and I’m speaking for myself here – I’m thrilled to be learning useful information I’m not already familiar with or that is less intuitive then, say, “Business Basics.” (*Disclaimer, the professor of the aforementioned course is entertaining and makes the material fun and interesting even for students familiar with the content.)

Data Analytics is an interesting business function that hasn’t always been utilized the way it can/should be and still isn’t utilized in many companies to its full potential. At the risk of sounding like a brownnoser (I doubt my stats professor will see this anyway because, “Ain’t nobody got time for dat!”), I’m genuinely excited to learn how to use data in my field. Despite the challenging and time-consuming assignments in this course, I’m enjoying myself. While I do like to solve difficult puzzles (including some math problems), I never actually enjoyed my math classes in undergrad because I didn’t see any realistic application in my field of study – and, I like to efficiently use my time. Give me information I can use. In this stats course, I will learn exactly how to apply what I’m learning in my field. I don’t even know how to adequately explain how excited this makes me. Plus, the hugeness of Big Data and how data analysis can be used in business intrigues me.

Which brings me to my staffing class. Did you know the most common staffing methods are almost no better than hiring people at random? With the use of data, businesses can more effectively hire the right people for the right job. My group and I get to turn in a hefty book paper that explains this in detail. Saweeet!

Employment Law is also a highly interesting class and has brought up issues I never knew existed. The group project for this class will be time consuming but fun.

With that said, I gotta go study/write/work on a project/play with my kid. You might not hear from me for 3 months.


Student-Client Pairing Projects

 

As the first semester of my second year as an MBA comes to a close, I would like to reflect on how the curriculum has been different between my first and second years in the program. As first year MBAs, we take classes concerned with the most traditional areas of business: from Accounting to Marketing, from Finance to Strategy, and beyond. But as second years, we get the opportunity to dive deeper into these topics, and sometimes this comes in the form of student-client pairings.

In my Advertising class, for example, our class has been partnered with Crimson Cup, a consulting, wholesaling and specialty roasting independent coffee company. The lectures for the class come from creative people at the largest independent creative agency in the country: Resource/Ammirati. Using their agency’s approach to digital advertising, we, students, are designing a digital strategy for Crimson Cup to grow their business.

ssss

Another student-client pairing that I have been a part of came from the Business and the Environment Class in which I am enrolled. The client our class is working with is1111
Soles4Souls, a non-profit organization that has high awareness and a strong global presence. Our class was split into groups to focus on solving Marketing, Recycling and Repurposing, Product Procurement, Domestic Micro-Enterprise, and Viral Campaign problems that their organization is currently facing.

Perhaps the most valuable part of this pairing comes from the fact that each group was instantly connected to a C-Suite executive at Soles4Souls. For example, my group was connected with Kevin Cherep, the Chief Development Officer, who was in attendance for our final presentation. With his direction, my group took off on a journey to draft a creative marketing strategy for their organization’s Travel Program.

While it’s important to get touch all of the bases of business through the first year of the MBA program, I feel that the most learning comes from these kinds of projects where we get to work with an organization through student-client pairings. Through these pairings, we, as students have the opportunity to develop connections with existing business leaders, and we get the opportunity learn on the job, if you will. While internships provide us with real-life experience, so too do these student-client pairing opportunities. And as a student currently on the job market, I know that these pairing opportunities will be an invaluable way for me to show what I can do in any future interviews.


The Internship Search Has Finally Come to a Close

As many of my classmates and friends are aware, I started my internship search back in August. It’s been a long journey, but I am very excited and could not be more pleased with my decision to accept an offer with Anheuser-Busch. Fisher’s Office of Career Management has helped me along every step of the way and I have the wonderful staff to thank for that.

AB is America's leading brewer

AB is America’s leading brewer

My experience interviewing with Anheuser-Busch was great. I first saw the company at the Fisher Fall Career Fair back in September, and was able to develop a good relationship with the recruiters through networking. I then did a first-round interview and was fortunate enough to be selected for the final panel interview in St. Louis. Because AB is headquartered in St. Louis, this was a great opportunity for me to really evaluate the organization’s culture and assess if I’d be a good fit for the company. I traveled to St. Louis in October with another one of my MHRM classmates, Natalie, who would also be interviewing on the final panel. Neither of us had been to St. Louis before, so it was a treat to explore the city and see all the different sights the day before our interview.

The morning of our interview, we arrived bright and early and met the other interview candidates from other schools across the country. I had never done a group interview before so I was not entirely sure what to expect. There were definitely some tough questions and it was interesting interviewing in a group setting with the other interview candidates right beside me, but I ultimately enjoyed the experience and found it extremely rewarding. After the interview, they took us on a tour of the headquarters and then on a brewery tour. We even got to see the Clydesdales! Overall, it was a great interview experience. Natalie and I both ended up getting offers to join AB’s People Department this summer, and we’re very excited to join the team!

Natalie and I before our brewery tour

Natalie and I before our brewery tour

Learning about the mashing process

Learning about the mashing process

Screen Shot 2014-12-09 at 10.00.06 PM

Learning about the seven-step brewing process


Buckeyes on Bourbon Street

As the first semester of the MAcc program came to a close, some students had more than just finals on their minds.  The last week of finals corresponded with the announcement that The Ohio State University’s football team made the first ever College Football Playoff and would be playing Alabama in the Sugar Bowl on New Years Day.  Hearing this news numerous MAcc students had their sights set on making it down to New Orleans to be part of the game and support the Buckeyes.  Luckily, around 10 or so MAcc students got tickets for the game either through the student lottery or other various ways; I was lucky enough to receive a free ticket from the student lottery provided by Taco Bell.  Through group messages and talking at lunch, we were able to plan the drive and hotel situation.  Since we were on break, many people were driving from different parts of the country (including one person who took a 16 hour megabus trip).

10922559_10153670335254657_6125634139079698939_n

Cafe Du Monde

Once we all got to New Orleans we made a plan for the trip.  We spent all of New Years Eve day in the city, seeing the sights and fully exploring the culture of New Orleans.  We stopped by Cafe Du Monde to enjoy some beignets and coffee, which is a must if you are ever there.  We also enjoyed an early dinner on Bourbon Street and were able to get some signature Louisiana dishes you always hear about.  New Orleans is without a doubt a city worth visiting if you get the chance (go to Pat O’Briens).

Jackson Square

Luckily for us we weren’t there just to see the city, we went for the Sugar Bowl.  New Years Day we got to the Superdome early to pick up our tickets and check out the pregame festivities.  The atmosphere surrounding the game was unreal and the streets were packed with both Ohio State and Alabama fans.  Having won a ticket in the student lottery I was able to be part of the student section and had seats only 11 rows up from the field.  It was a great game to be a part of and Ohio State was able to come away with a win, putting them in the National Championship against Oregon.  The whole experience was something I will never forget and it was wonderful to be able to share it with some of my best friends from the MAcc program.

10898225_10155071708930323_5433188474572164802_n

Script Ohio

10906343_2687442990618_4595907955271544409_n

Ohio State side of the Superdome


Fisher Follies: Fostering Community, Inspiring Creativity & Having FUN!

One of the greatest things about Fisher, which seems to come up quite often when I speak with prospective students, is the unique and supportive culture that we have here among students, staff and faculty. I truly believe it is rare to find a culture of collaboration where, for example, you can prep for an interview with a classmate who is interviewing for the same job. And, to have a community that truly cares about each other, their successes and their well-being.

That is the community that Fisher Follies, our unique social and non-profit organization here at Fisher, aims to foster. We raise money for the Fisher Follies Fund, which is a relief fund that make gifts (both monetary and in-kind) to any graduate student in the Fisher community that is facing extreme and unexpected hardship. Students are able to anonymously nominate themselves, or they can be nominated by two of their peers.

Each year, we hold a Fall Auction event that raises money for this fund. All auction items are donated by students, staff and faculty and range from dinner and desserts with other students or faculty, to your own personal “hype man” for a week, to a lavish trip to California to visit the “sea and c-suites” with one of your favorite professors. At this year’s event, which occurred on November 21st, we had over 110 items donated for our silent and live auction and over 200 people in attendance. Considered our “cocktail” event in the fall, it was a great time for everyone to dress up, take pictures at the photo booth, and socialize with their friends and professors.

In addition to it being an incredibly fun event for everyone, it was tremendously successful. We raised over $23,500 for the Fisher Follies Fund, which is the most money we have every raised at our annual auction! All of which goes directly back to students in need. This year, we unveiled the launch of our website, www.fisherfollies.com, so I encourage everyone to check it out to learn more about the Fisher community and the great things that we do as an organization.

Now that the auction is over, Fisher Follies will move on to begin writing and directing skits for our annual Variety Show in the Spring (February 20th), which celebrates our success and camaraderie as a community, and essentially enables us lampoon each other after a year of taking ourselves way too seriously.


Next Page »


The content and opinions expressed on this site do not necessarily reflect the views of nor are they endorsed by The Ohio State University or Fisher College of Business.